Naeem Mohaiemen, Last Man in Dhaka Central, 2015, film still. Courtesy the artist

Naeem Mohaiemen, Last Man in Dhaka Central, 2015, film still. Courtesy the artist

Naeem Mohaiemen, Last Man in Dhaka Central, 2015, film still. Courtesy the artist

In 1975, a military coup killed the President of Bangladesh, ending the country’s first Socialist government. A failed Maoist-inspired soldiers’ mutiny followed. Along with mutineers, also arrested was Peter Custers, a Dutch journalist who was close to the mutiny leader.

Last Man in Dhaka Central unspools two stories in reversed sequence. In a series of newsreels, we start at the end with Peter’s release. In the parallel, and contradictory, story recollected by Peter, memories unravel over books and clippings in his Dutch apartment. Like many European Leftists of his generation (especially post–Herbert Marcuse’s One-Dimensional Man), Peter believed that the revolutionary proletariat spirit might still be found ‘outside’ modernity in the Third World. Events provided a sharp divergence.

The film explores what it means to be a survivor of collapse, rather than the hoped-for witness to revolution. It intended to begin a longer dialogue with Peter, but has now become an unintentional memorial: a few months after its 2015 premiere, he passed away unexpectedly. The last man has finally said goodbye.

Last Man in Dhaka Central
Naeem Mohaiemen

FREE

Preview: Fri 2nd Mar, 7-10pm

3 March - 31 March 2018

Opening Times
Tue – Sun 12–6pm, closed Mon

Assembly House

55 Westgate Road
Newcastle
NE1 1SG