Kenneth Goldsmith. Photo: David Velasco, 2008

Radio Boredcast is archived at WFMU where you can listen to all 744-hours of this online radio project that ran continuously for the Festival month. WFMU is the longest-running freeform radio station in the US. Information about the programme schedule for this day is listed below. The Radio Boredcast archive can be listened to here.

SUN 4 MARCH: 12.32AM  

DAVE SOLDIER AND SEAN HAGGERTY: CHOPIN’S WALTZ IN THIRTY MINUTES
An old musician's joke is on the order of "it takes him twenty minutes to play the Minute Waltz". Here is a live performance of a collaboration with the late Frederic Chopin and living electronic musician Sean Hagerty. Dave Soldier performs the Minute Waltz on the grand piano at Le Poisson Rouge very very slowly, lasting more than twenty minutes, while Hagerty stretches the sound of each piano note out over time. From the Minute Waltz (Op 64, number 1, 1847, live performance August 21, 2010). http://davesoldier.com/experimental.html#Chopin


SUN 4 MARCH: 12.57AM
 

JOHN CAGE: SELECTED BY JONATHAN LEIDECKER
Since 1990 Jon Leidecker has performed appropriative collage music under the psuedonym Wobbly, aiming for extended narratives spun from spontaneous yet coherent multi-sample polyphony. In the Variations podcast series at Radio Web MACBA Jon Leidecker reconstructs the history of sound appropriationism by looking at examples from 20th century composition, popular art and commercial media, and the convergence of all these trends today. http://rwm.macba.cat/en/variations_tag/
http://detritus.net/wobbly/

PLAYLIST
Imaginary Landscape
Roaratorio  (excerpt)
Credo in Us
Fontana Mix and Aria
Europera 3  (excerpt)
Rozart Mix
Variations IV - Excerpts from 10pm to 11pm
Williams Mix (Larry Austin Reconstruction)
Empty Words (excerpt)


SUN 4 MARCH: 3.58AM
 

JOHN CAGE: LECTURE ON NOTHING


SUN 4 MARCH: 4.41AM
 

GAVIN BRYARS: TRAMP WITH ORCHESTRA II – JESUS BLOOD NEVER FAILED ME YET


SUN 4 MARCH: 4.57AM
 

JOSE LUIS CASTILLEJO: THE BOOK OF J’S
A writer, like any other artist, does not create experiences. Art creates works while experiences are anybody's privilege. The editor of Alga Marghen has asked me for a record. As I am not a singer, not even always except in very intimate moments a poet that plays with words, it did occur to me that perhaps this new record should be the record of my writing "The Book of J's".

In all honesty I must say that the published version of "The Book of J's" was written by a machine, the computer. While this version that I am doing for Alga Marghen is written by myself, of my own hand, with pen, ink, and paper. It records the process of writing a book. Without this record the act of writing, the so called creative act, will be lost in the final result. It is the act of creation that has been recorded. In spite of all the noise about creation, creation itself is a quiet act done in recollection.  Perhaps not a big deal. But it is a quietness that results in a real work of the spirit. (Jose Luis Castillejo, Madrid, December 3, 1999)


SUN 4 MARCH: 6.00AM
 

CHRIS WATSON: SUKAU PART 1 – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
Over a period of 5 days whilst in Borneo, I went out into the jungle before sunrise and set up a stereo recording system and left it running - something I never usually do. The results are really good and I have a collection of sunrise tracks in the Sukau rainforest of Sabah in Borneo over successive mornings with a range of bird and other animal sounds as well as the characteristic sounds of tropical rainforest; that is huge amounts of humidity and moisture slowly percolating down from the canopy 40m overhead. (Chris Watson)

Chris Watson is one of the world's leading recorders of wildlife and natural phenomena. In 1971 he was a founding member of the influential Sheffield-based experimental music group Cabaret Voltaire. His sound recording career began in 1981 when he joined Tyne Tees Television. Since then he has developed a particular and passionate interest in recording the wildlife sounds of animals, habitats and atmospheres from around the world. His television work includes Bill Oddie Back in the USA, Springwatch, Autumnwatch and The One Show. http://www.chriswatson.net


SUN 4 MARCH: 7.23AM
 

DANIELA CASCELLA: 31 DAYS, SLOW AND STILL

31 DAYS READING LE PONT MIRABEAU BY GUILLAUME APOLLINAIRE AT 8.30AM – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
Le pont Mirabeau is a poem by Guillaume Apollinaire, published in his 1913 collection Alcools. In response to the theme and the structure of As Slow As Possible/Radio Boredcast, I chose to record myself reading Le pont Mirabeau at 8.30 in the morning for 31 days, anticipating and mirroring the duration of the broadcast in a different place and at a different time.

I chose this poem because of its slow flowing against its slowing into stillness – the flow of water, time and words in the stanzas against the circularity of time in the refrain. The adjective ‘slow’ appears still in the third stanza, the same one that contains ‘love’, ‘hope’, ‘violent’. The adjective ‘still’ appears slow in the refrain, as an impossibility. In the original French poem, ‘slow’ rhymes with ‘violent’ and ‘still I stay’ with ‘hours’.

The lack of punctuation throughout the poem calls not only for a flow of words, but also for different rhythms and meanings arising out of each reading. The readings always took place in my office, sometimes as dedicated recordings, sometimes while I was preparing to go out, sometimes while I was reading the paper or checking the news online. I learned the poem by heart, so sometimes the recordings mirror my small hesitations and gaps in recalling the verses. An old phonograph recording of Apollinaire reading the poem (from the Archives de Parole, Collection Phonothèque Nationale - Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris) supported some of the readings.

Daniela Cascella is a writer and curator based in London since 2009. Her research is focused on sound and on the way it seeps into other formats, most of all text. Her most recent projects explore and employ fictional tropes in writing criticism and descriptions of sound in fiction. She has recently finished writing her third book, En abÎme: a narrative across listening, reading and writing-as-landscape, as part of her research in the MFA Art Writing at Goldsmiths College that she completed in 2011. http://www.danielacascella.com


SUN 4 MARCH: 7.27AM

CHRIS WATSON: LUSKENTYRE – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
Luskentyre is a 32-minute time compression of a cycle of the tide on a beach in the western isles of Scotland.

Chris Watson is one of the world's leading recorders of wildlife and natural phenomena. In 1971 he was a founding member of the influential Sheffield-based experimental music group Cabaret Voltaire. His sound recording career began in 1981 when he joined Tyne Tees Television. Since then he has developed a particular and passionate interest in recording the wildlife sounds of animals, habitats and atmospheres from around the world. His television work includes Bill Oddie Back in the USA, Springwatch, Autumnwatch and The One Show. http://www.chriswatson.net


SUN 4 MARCH: 8.00AM

PARAMANANDA: A MEDITATION ON THE BODY
From Change Your Mind - Body Awareness And Relaxation by Paramananda. Change Your Mind by Paramananda was one of the best-selling meditation books produced by the FWBO. Paramananda's considerable experience of meditation and in social work led him to an approach to sitting practice that tried to take account of the whole person, body and 'soul'. Judging by the popularity of his teaching he seems to have hit on something vital to forming an enduring positive relationship with meditation as a way to transform your sense of self and of life. Paramananda recorded taped audio guides to meditation for Dharmachakra in 1998, intended to complement his book. http://www.freebuddhistaudio.com


SUN 4 MARCH: 8.27AM

YOSHI WADA: LAMENT FOR THE RISE AND FALL OF THE ELEPHANTINE CROCODILE – SIDE B


SUN 4 MARCH: 8.50AM

YOSHI WADA: OFF THE WALL – PART 1


SUN 4 MARCH: 9.11AM

JOHN CAGE AND DAVID TUDOR: INDETERMINACY – PART 1 AND 2
In Zen they say: If something is boring after two minutes, try it for four. If it is still boring, try it for eight, sixteen, thirty-two, and so on.  Eventually one discovers that it's not boring at all but very interesting. (John Cage)


SUN 4 MARCH: 9.58AM

KENNETH GOLDSMITH: SEVEN AMERICAN DEATHS AND DISASTERS
Lecture by KENNETH GOLDSMITH 11.06.10 à Université Paris Est Marne-La-Vallée, Cité Descartes

Kenneth Goldsmith's writing has been called some of the most exhaustive and beautiful collage work yet produced in poetry by Publishers Weekly. Goldsmith is the author of ten books of poetry, founding editor of the online archive UbuWeb, and the editor I'll Be Your Mirror: The Selected Andy Warhol Interviews. From 1996-2009, Goldsmith was the host of a weekly radio show on New York City's WFMU. He teaches writing at The University of Pennsylvania, where he is a senior editor of PennSound, an online poetry archive. In 2011, he co-edited, Against Expression: An Anthology of Conceptual Writing and published a book of essays, Uncreative Writing: Managing Language in the Digital Age. In May 2011, he was invited to read at The White House for President and Mrs. Obama's "A Celebration of American Poetry." Goldsmith will participate in dOCUMENTA(13) in Kassel, Germany, 2012. http://epc.buffalo.edu/authors/goldsmith/


SUN 4 MARCH: 11.06AM

ERGO PHIZMIZ SINGS GILBERT AND SULLIVAN: THE PIRATES OF PENZANCE – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
Around the age of 11 or 12 I became obsessed with the comic operettas of Gilbert & Sullivan. This fascination lasted around 3 years. There were posters of W.S. Gilbert (the "S" stands for Schwenck, rather spectacularly) and Arthur Sullivan on my bedroom wall.

For years the thought of returning to their works "from memory" has been at the back of my mind. My very boring contribution to Radio Boredcast is "acappella" versions of the G & S operettas "HMS Pinafore", "Iolanthe", "The Pirates of Penzance" and "The Mikado".

Some of them I know better than others. In the cases where I didn't know the melodies, I made them up or roughly talked through them. I also decided to not use different voices for characters (these recordings are my second takes - the first takes sounded like The Goon Show and to be honest I had far too much fun doing them for it be genuinely boring), and to omit stage directions, so we are left with a very boring barrage of Victorian words, tuned and untuned, from my tired, monotone voice.

Ergo Phizmiz is a composer, writer, and multimedia artist. He makes pop, theatre, installations, opera, radio-art, radioplays, sound-collages and performances. He lives in Bridport, UK, and has a headache. He never wants to perform Gilbert & Sullivan again. http://ergophizmiz.net


SUN 4 MARCH: 11.59AM

RADIO WEB MACBA PRESENTS: COMPOSING WITH PROCESS: PERSPECTIVES ON GENERATIVE AND SYSTEMS MUSIC #5.1. DURATION

BY MARK FELL AND JOE GILMORE  
Ràdio Web MACBA is the Museu d'art contemporani de Barcelona (MACBA) online radio project. http://rwm.macba.cat

This episode explores the concept of duration in music. It examines the different ways that composers and musicians have explored duration in terms of both the large and small. Bringing together ideas and theories of the engineer Denis Gabor and composers Iannis Xenakis and Curtis Roads, this episode examines early tape and computer music works using granular and pulsar synthesis. The show closes with a focus on two recent treatments of time in music: by the German artist Hanne Darboven and media producer Terre Thaemlitz. http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/composingwithprocess_5_mark_fell_joe_gilmore/capsula


SUN 4 MARCH: 1.37PM

RADIO BOREDCAST PRESENTS… KENNETH GOLDSMITH 
Kenneth Goldsmith's writing has been called some of the most exhaustive and beautiful collage work yet produced in poetry by Publishers Weekly. Goldsmith is the author of ten books of poetry, founding editor of the online archive UbuWeb, and the editor I'll Be Your Mirror: The Selected Andy Warhol Interviews. From 1996-2009, Goldsmith was the host of a weekly radio show on New York City's WFMU. He teaches writing at The University of Pennsylvania, where he is a senior editor of PennSound, an online poetry archive. In 2011, he co-edited, Against Expression: An Anthology of Conceptual Writing and published a book of essays, Uncreative Writing: Managing Language in the Digital Age. In May 2011, he was invited to read at The White House for President and Mrs. Obama's "A Celebration of American Poetry." Goldsmith will participate in dOCUMENTA(13) in Kassel, Germany, 2012. http://epc.buffalo.edu/authors/goldsmith/

PLAYLIST
Kenneth Goldsmith Discussing Poetry Day at the White House on WFMU, May 18, 2011
Introduction to "Fidget" at the Kelly Writers House
Fidget - 15:00 
Uncreativity as a Creative Practice - The Line Reading Series, The Drawing Center, NYC
The Special Story of "Miracles" - The Kenny G Letters
From Day 
Kenneth Goldsmith Sings Baudrillard
The Last Acts of St. Fuck You 
Why Johnny Cash is Cooler than Henry Rollins 
Eighteen Earrers
Slobodan Milosevic and Kenny G - The Kenny G Letters
Kenneth Goldsmith Sings Adorno, Part 1
The Ayatollah of Rock and Rollah 
Part of 12:00 - Fidget
Kenneth Goldsmith Sings Nada Gordon 
Excerpt from Head Citations
Lunch Poets - Being Boring at the Kelly Writers House 
Lunch Poets - Question And Answers at the Kelly Writers House
17:00 - Fidget


SUN 4 MARCH: 4.17PM

LEIF ELGGREN AND THOMAS LILJENBERG: 9.11 – DESPERATION IS THE MOTHER OF LAUGHTER (EXCERPT)
"As close as you can get to us." 
Between 1995 - 96 the artist´s Thomas Liljenberg and Leif Elggren wrote over 200 letters to powerful and famous persons and institutions all over the world. Accusing the receivers for stealing ideas from the artist's unconscious dreamlife and at the same times call for economical compensation. Almost every letters ends with: "Send us money on Swedish postal number..."

The whole correspondence is published as a book ("Experiment with Dreams", Firework Edition 1996). Illustration and a informative preface together with the letters makes the book a comprehensible but horrifying reflection of the social and economical state of the world today.

Together with the book Experiment with Dreams there was a CD released called Zzz... ("As close as we can get to the dream."). This new CD, 9.11, is in many ways a development from the Zzz... and is closely related to the forthcoming book The Answers.


SUN 4 MARCH: 5.00PM

DO OR DIY WITH PEOPLE LIKE US: 1234 – PART 1 – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
1234 is a show all about counting in music, sound art, poetry and lunacy.

DO or DIY is a freeform sound art radio show broadcast weekly by Vicki Bennett (People Like Us) on WFMU. The philosophy behind the show is simple. That within the realms of avant-garde and experimental sound art the goalposts defining "accessible" and "inaccessible" are constantly moving. As the radar rises and dips, fragments and shards of underground creations unearth, and popular culture and artist resonate, shifting shapes accordingly with one another in reflections of changing spotlights. Each show consists of collages made of sound works from the 20th and 21st century, often layered and looped many times over, resulting in an album type effect on each show. http://www.wfmu.org/peoplelikeus

PLAYLIST
Owada - Hello
Ergo Phizmiz - Symphonie Vum - First Movement
Philip Glass and Robert Wilson - Knee Play
YOUR DJ SPEAKS Mystic Moods Orchestra - Theme From A Summer Place
Daniel Levitin - Anticipation
Roman Opalka - 1 To Infinity
Owada - Up Plus Down
I'm On My Journey Home - Eephing
Sten Hanson - La Destruction De Votre Code Genetique Par Drogues Toxins Et Irradiation
YOUR DJ SPEAKS Bruce Nauman - Rhythmic Stamping
Steve Reich - Clapping Music
Letter People - Miss I
Eugene Brice - Consonants
Patrick Ireland - Vowel Drawing
Owada - Circle
Kelly Mark - I Really Should
YOUR DJ SPEAKS Mystic Moods Orchestra - Theme From A Summer Place
Elisabeth Claire Prophet - Great Divine Rectors
Livestock Auctioneers (1964)
Otto Muehl - Psycho-Motorik - Jodler
Livestock Auctioneers (1963)
Owada - Low
Livestock Auctioneers (1967)
Bobby Joe Carter - Doe A Deer
YOUR DJ SPEAKS Mystic Moods Orchestra - Theme From A Summer Place
Vito Acconci - Under History Lessons 1976
Letter People - Mr D.
Speech Accent Archive
YOUR DJ SPEAKS Mystic Moods Orchestra - Theme From A Summer Place
Richard Nonas - What Do You Know
Ollie Halsall And John Halsey - Bum Love


SUN 4 MARCH: 5.54PM

CAROLINE BERGVALL PRESENTS – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
Caroline Bergvall is a writer and artist. Projects alternate between books, audio pieces, performances and language installations. Latest book: Meddle English: New and Selected Texts (Nightboat Books, 2011). Latest solo show: Middling English (John Hansard Gallery, 2010).
http://www.carolinebergvall.com

PLAYLIST
Voice - Caroline Bergvall 
Shorter American Memory - Rosmarie Waldrop 
Invocation - Caroline Bergvall 
A Priori - Rachel Zolf 
Unrelated Incidents, No. 3 - Tom Leonard 
Wash - Caroline Bergvall
Transformation Hymn - Lee Ann Brown 
To Hell - Eileen Myles
Catullus #48 - Bernadette Mayer
A Blessing in Disguise - John Ashbery
Pass - Caroline Bergvall 
Souls of the Labadie Tract Track 1 - David Grubbs/Susan Howe
Live Fondation Cartier Paris - J. Giorno, P. Oliveros, Fred Frith
Ritual with Giant Hissing Madagascar Cockroaches (Excerpt) - Miya Masakoa
Roaches - Joe Brainard
Feed - Caroline Bergvall 
Song - Caroline Bergvall 
Lidl Suga A - C Bergvall
Lidl Suga S - C Bergvall/ Ciaran Maher 
Birdcalls - Louise Lawler 
MontBlanc - Shelley/read by Caroline Bergvall 
Fold - Caroline Bergvall
Corset - Anne Waldman/Ambrose Bye
Rally - Meredith Monk
Dream - Caroline Bergvall 


SUN 4 MARCH: 7.06PM

DAVE SOLDIER: TIMELESS RADIO PROJECT – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
Timeless Music, explains the two physical dimensions of music and approaches to manipulate them, with musical examples.

For recorded music, the dimensions are air pressure amplitude and time: and for composed music the dimensions are frequency and time. We explore some approaches for how one can play with these dimensions, for example using fractal patterns with partial dimensions, so that issues like tempo become undefined, and the length of music become ambiguous.

The show includes explanations / illustrations of how to make deliberate fractal patterns in music, Fourier transform music and even a straightfoward explanation of white noise. (These are really not hard, and I'd like to think I explain them with minimal jargon.)

Exploring this direction, I have prepared some math music:

The variations on Chopin's Minute Waltz uses integrals, derivatives, averages, and more.

My third string quartet, "The Essential" consists of mathematical variations on the second movement of Arnold Schoenberg’s Second Quartet, and can be heard and the score downloaded from the Scores page. It includes a derivative movement, an integral (very short), a fractal movement, and a Fourier transform.

Olivia Porphyria, a fractal on Haydn's name, from Organum can also be heard and the score downloaded from the Scores page at: http://www.davesoldier.com

Here are scores for two other fractal pieces for trombone and two guitars, Fractal on the Name of Haydn (http://davesoldier.com/scores/FractalHaydn4.30.Frets.pdf) and Fractal on the Name of Bach (http://davesoldier.com/scores/FractalBach4.30.pdf). For clarity, though, I advise starting with the Fractal Variation in "The Essential Quartet" (see score page) which is easier to follow and is essentially equivalent to a Koch snowflake pattern.

Why haven't integrals and derivatives been used to compose? It's not hard. Here's a mini-lesson on making a derivative or integral version of a musical theme:

Use a C major scale, CDEFGABC

Assigning a number to each note, here starting at 0=C, the scale is

0,2,4,5,7,9,11,12

For a first derivative, subtract each note from the preceding note,

(0),2,2,1,2,2,2,1

Which using the original scale tones would be

C,D,D,Db,D,D,D,Db: voila'! the first derivative

To integrate the derivative add each number to the previous,

(0),2,4,5,7,9,11,12: which returns the original scale

Integrate the original scale, and you'll see why integrals of the music rapidly go beyond the range of hearing! Examples are in the Essential Quartet and the Chopin Variations below, both with very short integral movements.

Dave Soldier leads a double life as a musician and a neuroscientist. As a composer, he developed a repertoire for groups including the Thai Elephant Orchestra, 14 elephants for whom he built giant instruments and who released 3 CDs, and projects with children, including rural Guatemala (Yol Ku: Mayan Mountain Music) and New York's East Harlem (Da HipHop Raskalz). His Soldier String Quartet helped usher the use of hiphop, R&B, and punk rock into classical music in the 1980s, and his long-running Memphis/New York Delta punk band, the Kropotkins, is a cult favorite. His composed The People's Choice Music: the most wanted and unwanted songs, following poll results of likes and dislikes of the American population, with artists Komar & Melamid; song cycle/oratorios in collaborations with Kurt Vonnegut, and many chamber and classical works. As a performer and arranger, he worked with John Cale, Bo Diddley, Van Dyke Parks, David Byrne, and many jazz and avant garde acts, appearing on over 100 albums and films on violin, guitar, or arranger. As David Sulzer, he is a neuroscientist and Professor at Columbia University in the Departments of Psychiatry and Neurology. http://davesoldier.com/experimental.html


SUN 4 MARCH: 7.51PM

MATMOS: MUSIQUE CONCRETE HOUR 1 – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
In response to the invitation to contribute sound, which somehow speaks to the stated theme of slow audio, we have decided to focus upon musique concrete and its aftermath. The original practitioners of the musique concrete tradition - which was a global phenomenon, and not simply a continental one as it often supposed - had to work carefully, methodically, and above all, slowly. In order to capture, manipulate, process and assemble their work, decisions had to be made and enacted, plans drawn up, trials conducted and errors removed. Lots of painstaking, hands on work stands behind each edit, each cut, each splice, each pass through a filter or into a process. The music soaks up and stores time, and it plays with time as a basic material. This music is both intensive and extensive in its demands upon its creators and its listeners. That said, we have not narrowly emphasized only the pioneers, but have sought to draw some connections between the first generation and subsequent audio, which seems to us to draw inspiration from this methodology. Slow down and enjoy.

Matmos is M.C. Schmidt and Drew Daniel, aided and abetted by many others. In their recordings and live performances over the last nine years, Matmos have used the sounds of: amplified crayfish nerve tissue, the pages of bibles turning, a bowed five string banjo, slowed down whistles and kisses, water hitting copper plates, the runout groove of a vinyl record, a $5.00 electric guitar, liposuction surgery, cameras and VCRs, chin implant surgery, contact microphones on human hair, violins, rat cages, tanks of helium, violas, human skulls, cellos, peck horns, tubas, cards shuffling, field recordings of conversations in hot tubs, frequency response tests for defective hearing aids, a steel guitar recorded in a sewer, electrical interference generated by laser eye surgery, whoopee cushions and balloons, latex fetish clothing, rhinestones on a dinner plate, Polish trains, insects, ukelele, aspirin tablets hitting a drum kit from across the room, dogs barking, people reading aloud, life support systems and inflatable blankets, records chosen by the roll of dice, an acupuncture point detector conducting electrical current through human skin, rock salt crunching underfoot, solid gold coins spinning on bars of solid silver, the sound of a frozen stream thawing in the sun, a five gallon bucket of oatmeal. http://brainwashed.com/matmos/bio/


SUN 4 MARCH: 8.55PM
 

FELIX KUBIN: MOTHER IN THE FRIDGE – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
A radio play without a script by Felix Kubin. "Mother in the Fridge" is based on a phone conversation between my mother and me. I recorded this call spontaneously in order to take revenge on the many words that I am carrying around with me.

My mother loves to talk and she loves to talk in English. As I knew of the Radio Boredcast project of my friend Vicki Bennett, I suddenly decided to make this a long conversation in English with a lot of twists and little stories and some experiments with my mobile phone. I started to place the phone (=my mother) in all kinds of different sonic environments in order to test the corresponding acoustics and see what it does to the imagination of the listener. This idea led to a playfully improvised radio drama about early reflections on late memories.

Most people who take a call from my mother don't get away with a talk under 40 minutes. That's why this radio play has a duration of 40 minutes. The remaining music of the one hour show contains improvisations by Fritz Ostermayer and me while preparing for a lecture on the Austrian anarchist Herbert Müller-Guttenbrunn in November 2010. (Felix Kubin, Hamburg, December 2011).

Felix Kubin is a composer, radio-playwright, curator and media artist. He began recording and performing experimental electronic pop music at the age of 12. In the 1990s he turned to electroacoustic noise music and formed “Klangkrieg” with Tim Buhre. From 1992-1994 he co-organised artistic political interventions with the Dada-communist Party KED and the “Liedertafel Margot Honecker” singing group, whose notorious actions received wide media coverage. In 1998 Kubin started to produce Futuristic pop music and launched the independent record label “Gagarin Records”. Over the past decade he has performed at eighty international music and media arts festivals including Sonar, Club Transmediale, Mutek, ISEA, Wien Modern and Ars Electronica. Since 2001, Kubin has been writing and producing radio plays for national radio stations WDR, BR, DR, SWF and Vienna’s ORF Kunstradio. http://www.felixkubin.com  


SUN 4 MARCH: 9.57PM
 

MICHAEL RUBY: FIRST NAMES
I wrote “First Names” in the late spring and summer of 1989 on my subway rides to work—the R train from Union St. in Brooklyn to Cortlandt St. in Lower Manhattan. It’s the only work I’ve ever written on my subway rides. I’m not sure how I got the idea for it. My girlfriend Louisa Wood had a book lying around about the astrological significance of first names. We were getting married that summer, putting together endless lists of people we wanted to invite to the wedding. We were also reaching that point in life when we started thinking about names for children. In any event, I wanted to make something out of all the people in my mind, all the names in my mind, people I’d known or heard of or imagined. I wanted to represent a society, a world. In general, during that time, I was striving in my poetry to represent simultaneity and the endlessness of experience. (Michael Ruby)

Michael Ruby is the author of five poetry books: At an Intersection (Alef, 2002), Window on the City (BlazeVOX, 2006), The Edge of the Underworld (BlazeVOX, 2010), Compulsive Words (BlazeVOX, 2010) and The Star-Spangled Banner (Dusie, 2011). His trilogy, Memories, Dreams and Inner Voices, is forthcoming in Spring 2012 from Station Hill Press, and includes Fleeting Memories, an Ugly Duckling Presse ebook, and Inner Voices Heard Before Sleep, an Argotist Online ebook; his poetry book American Songbook is forthcoming in Fall 2012 from Ugly Duckling.  A graduate of Harvard College and Brown University’s writing program, he lives in Brooklyn and works as an editor of U.S. news and political articles at The Wall Street Journal.

As Slow As Possible Statement -
In the 1980s, when I was in my twenties, I tried and failed to write a manifesto about poetry. It began: Poems slow the reader down. A good story makes readers want to leap ahead and find out what happened. A good poem makes readers slow to a halt, lose themselves in the present of these few words, perhaps even going backward, realizing that there's more in what they passed than they thought. It forces them to regard each word, to try to join the writer in selecting each word. Words break free from their contexts. If we accept the view of Roman Jakobson, in fiction and nonfiction, the communication/mimesis predominates; in poetry, the words themselves predominate.  The signifier over the signified.

LANGUAGE poetry, by destroying conventional syntax, by putting words next to each other that don't normally go together, forces the reader to read one word at a time.  In a formal sense, it's pure poetry.  But what a sacrifice it makes to guarantee its purity.  Compare Clark Coolidge and Shakespeare, which is also pure poetry.

One way the writer causes the reader to slow down is by writing one word at a time.  However, prose can be written that way, too.  So what lets poetry further "charm" language?  The weight at the end of each line that we have to keep pushing aside? The cliche that a poem can't be paraphrased is another way of saying this. It's this that makes Stein and Zukofsky such radical figures in our tradition, though perhaps descendants of Rimbaud and Mallarme, who, in “Un Coup…,” partially accomplished this by spacing out the words.


SUN 4 MARCH: 10.34PM
 

RADIO WEB MACBA PRESENTS: INTERVIEW WITH RICK PRELINGER
Ràdio Web MACBA is the Museu d'art contemporani de Barcelona (MACBA) online radio project. http://rwm.macba.cat

Rick Prelinger is an archivist, writer, filmmaker, and outsider librarian. For the past twenty-five years, the founder of the Prelinger Archives has amassed film material that is generally ignored by traditional archives, resulting in a collection that prioritizes access and reuse as methods of preservation. Rick has partnered with the Internet Archive (of which he is a board member) to make 2,100 films available online for free viewing, downloading and reuse. With Megan Prelinger, he's co-founder of Prelinger Library, an appropriation-friendly private research library open to the public in downtown San Francisco. Rick Prelinger speaks on the future of archives and issues relating to access to archives and culture. http://rwm.macba.cat/en/sonia/rick_prelinger/capsula


SUN 4 MARCH: 11.01PM
 

GWILLY EDMONDEZ: STAKEOUT – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
1 – STAKEOUT (Gwilly Edmondez – voice & sampler)

‘Stakeout’ explores the suspension of time inherent to the stakeout in the world of cops as per its depiction in crime fiction and the movies. The narrative moves between two locales: Phoenix, Arizona, in an abstraction from James Sallis’s The Killer Is Dying, and Bridgend-(Wales)-masquerading-as-New-York where Gwilly reprises the role of detective Henry Zubradski that he played in the Tony Gage movies Deep Cop and Deep Cop2: Too Deep A Cop (both 1993).

Gwilly Edmondez has been making improvised music, composed music, collage and noise, officially, since co-founding Radioactive Sparrow in Bridgend, South Wales in 1980. Since 2004, in civilian life he has taught at the School of Arts & Cultures at Newcastle University. He currently performs and records as a solo artist and in multiple/multiplying group outfits. New work can be followed at the following locations:

http://feltbeak.tumblr.com
http://www.kakutopia.com
http://www.youtube.com/user/prducer
http://vimeo.com/gwillyedmondez
http://freemusicarchive.org/label/Kakutopia/

A selection of older work is also featured at UbuWeb:
http://www.ubu.com/sound/edmondez.html

 

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Radio Boredcast:
Day 4

Sun 4 March 2012, 12am–12am
To listen click here
Read blog here

DAY 4 SCHEDULE:

12.32am: Dave Soldier and Sean Haggerty: Chopin's Waltz in Thirty Minutes

12.57am: John Cage: Selected by Jonathan Leidecker

3.58am: John Cage: Lecture on Nothing

4.41am: Gavin Bryars: Tramp with Orchestra II - Jesus’ Blood Never Failed Me Yet

4.57am: Jose Luis Castillejo: The Book of J's

6.00am: Chris Watson: Sukau - Part 1

7.23am: Daniela Cascella: 31 Days, Slow and Still

7.27am: Chris Watson: Luskentyre

8.00am: Paramananda: A Meditation on the Body

8.27am: Yoshi Wada: Lament for the Rise and Fall of the Elephantine Crocodile - Side B                           

8.50am: Yoshi Wada: Off The Wall - Part 1

9.11am: John Cage and David Tudor: Indeterminacy - Part 1 and 2

9.58am: Kenneth Goldsmith: Seven American Deaths and Disasters

11.06am: Ergo Phizmiz Sings Gilbert and Sullivan: The Pirates of Penzance

11.59am: Radio Web MACBA Presents: Composing With Process

1.37pm: Radio Boredcast Presents... Kenneth Goldsmith

4.17pm: Leif Elggren and Thomas Liljenberg: 9.11 - Desperation is the Mother of Laughter (excerpt) 

5.00pm: DO or DIY with People Like Us: 1234 - Part 1

5.54pm: Caroline Bergvall Presents…

7.06pm: Dave Soldier: Timeless Radio Project

7.51pm: Matmos: Musique Concrete Hour 1

8.55pm: Felix Kubin: Mother in the Fridge

9.57pm: Michael Ruby: First Names

10.34pm: Radio Web MACBA Presents: Interview with Rick Prelinger 

11.01pm: Gwilly Edmondez: Stakeout