Jem Finer. Photo: Steve Pyke

Radio Boredcast is archived at WFMU where you can listen to all 744-hours of this online radio project that ran continuously for the Festival month. WFMU is the longest-running freeform radio station in the US. Information about the programme schedule for this day is listed below. The Radio Boredcast archive can be listened to here.

SAT 3 MARCH: 12.00AM

NICOLAS COLLINS: IT WAS A DARK AND STORMY NIGHT


SAT 3 MARCH: 12.26AM

OLD SHIPPING FORECAST
An old shipping forecast (or two) to help you into the land of nod.


SAT 3 MARCH: 12.48AM

JEM FINER: LONGPLAYER EXCERPT – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
Jem Finer has made four 6-hour recordings of Longplayer to broadcast this month. Longplayer is a one thousand year long musical composition. It began playing at midnight on the 31st of December 1999, and will continue to play without repetition until the last moment of 2999, at which point it will complete its cycle and begin again. Conceived and composed by Jem Finer, it was originally produced as an Artangel commission, and is now in the care of the Longplayer Trust.

Longplayer is composed for singing bowls – an ancient type of standing bell – which can be played by both humans and machines, and whose resonances can be very accurately reproduced in recorded form. It is designed to be adaptable to unforeseeable changes in its technological and social environments, and to endure in the long-term as a self-sustaining institution. http://longplayer.org

Jem Finer is a UK-based artist, musician and composer. Since studying computer science in the 1970s, he has worked in a variety of fields, including photography, film, experimental and popular music and installation. He is currently working on a number of new projects continuing his interest in long-term sustainability and the reconfiguring of older technologies.


SAT 3 MARCH: 6.49AM

WOBBLY AND ANDREA WILLIAMS: MORE NATURE LIVE AT MILLS COLLEGE (9 MAY 2010)
Andrea Williams is an artist, composer, and educator currently based in Oakland, CA. She enjoys using site-specific elements and perceptual cues to reveal the unseen connections between people and their environment. Listening, memory, urban ecology, and group collaboration are recurrent themes. Her compositions, soundwalks, installations, and videos have been exhibited and performed both solo and with various artists at galleries and alternative spaces, most recently at the Whitney Museum, Yerba Buena Gardens Festival, Joyce Theater Soho, Children's Creativity Museum, Fountain Miami Art Fair, and the Mamori sound artist residency in the Amazon rainforest. Andrea is the Co-Director for the sound art non-profit, 23five, a Co-Founder of the New York Society for Acoustic Ecology, and has an MFA in Electronic Music and Recording Media from Mills College. www.listeninglistening.com

Since 1990 Jon Leidecker has performed appropriative collage music under the psuedonym Wobbly, aiming for extended narratives spun from spontaneous yet coherent multi-sample polyphony. In the Variations podcast series at Radio Web MACBA Jon Leidecker reconstructs the history of sound appropriationism by looking at examples from 20th century composition, popular art and commercial media, and the convergence of all these trends today. http://rwm.macba.cat/en/variations_tag/
http://detritus.net/wobbly/


SAT 3 MARCH: 7.55AM

DORIAN JONES: TOILETS FOR EUROPE’S GREAT CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
Dorian Jones is a retired mashup artist formerly known as Arty Fufkin. As a musician he plays jazz double bass and has written and produced several documentary film scores. When his day job as an arts manager took him to Venice Biennale in 2009, Dorian took the opportunity to visit some of Europe's great cultural institutions making the field recordings of their toilet facilities for this project.


SAT 3 MARCH: 9.15AM

DANIELA CASCELLA: 31 DAYS, SLOW AND STILL

31 DAYS READING LE PONT MIRABEAU BY GUILLAUME APOLLINAIRE AT 8.30AM – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
Le pont Mirabeau is a poem by Guillaume Apollinaire, published in his 1913 collection Alcools. In response to the theme and the structure of As Slow As Possible/Radio Boredcast, I chose to record myself reading Le pont Mirabeau at 8.30 in the morning for 31 days, anticipating and mirroring the duration of the broadcast in a different place and at a different time.

I chose this poem because of its slow flowing against its slowing into stillness – the flow of water, time and words in the stanzas against the circularity of time in the refrain. The adjective ‘slow’ appears still in the third stanza, the same one that contains ‘love’, ‘hope’, ‘violent’. The adjective ‘still’ appears slow in the refrain, as an impossibility. In the original French poem, ‘slow’ rhymes with ‘violent’ and ‘still I stay’ with ‘hours’.

The lack of punctuation throughout the poem calls not only for a flow of words, but also for different rhythms and meanings arising out of each reading. The readings always took place in my office, sometimes as dedicated recordings, sometimes while I was preparing to go out, sometimes while I was reading the paper or checking the news online. I learned the poem by heart, so sometimes the recordings mirror my small hesitations and gaps in recalling the verses. An old phonograph recording of Apollinaire reading the poem (from the Archives de Parole, Collection Phonothèque Nationale - Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris) supported some of the readings.

Daniela Cascella is a writer and curator based in London since 2009. Her research is focused on sound and on the way it seeps into other formats, most of all text. Her most recent projects explore and employ fictional tropes in writing criticism and descriptions of sound in fiction. She has recently finished writing her third book, En abÎme: a narrative across listening, reading and writing-as-landscape, as part of her research in the MFA Art Writing at Goldsmiths College that she completed in 2011. http://www.danielacascella.com


SAT 3 MARCH: 9.17AM

ANALOG ARTS ENSEMBLE: BEGINNING – ASLSP
Written in 1985 for the University of Maryland International Piano Festival and Competition, ASLSP stands for “As SLow aS Possible”. The title also refers to the opening line in the final paragraph of Finnegan’s Wake, “Soft morning city. Lsp!”. The piece was commissioned by the Friends of the Maryland Summer Institute for the Creative and Performing Arts and dedicated to the memory of Madolyn Leonard. http://artsaha.org

Bearing in mind the utter tedium of competition judging, John Cage thought his open score would be as much a challenge for performers as it would be a change of pace for the judges. The piece consists of eight small movements, one of which is to be omitted, and one of which is to be repeated at the performer’s discretion, a format that ensured the competition judges would never hear the same performance twice. John Cage’s revision of the work, Organ2: ASLSP, is currently being performed in Halberstadt, Germany over the course of 639 years. In the same epic tradition, Joseph Drew performed the original for nine hours at ARTSaha! 2006.


SAT 3 MARCH: 9.42AM

PETER GRUDZIEN: NOTHING
From Interesting Results CD Curated by Irwin Chusid


SAT 3 MARCH: 9.50AM

PEOPLE LIKE US: NOTHING
From Abridged Too Far by People Like Us - on UbuWeb


SAT 3 MARCH: 9.54AM

CRAIG DWORKIN: PARADOXICALLY QUICKENING EFFECTS FROM TIME SLOWING, RETARDING AND STRETCHING
1. Erik Satie - Vexations [LTMCD 2389]
Sometime around 1893, Erik Satie penned a short modal bass theme with two variations -- three lines of music and scarcely one hundred notes, but with the suggestion that they are to be repeated eight-hundred and forty times. The score has two enigmatic legends; one concerns the order in which the bass theme and the variations are played, while the other reads: "In order to play the motif 840 times in succession, one would do well to prepare oneself in advance, and in the deepest silence, by serious immobilities." A full run through the 840 repetitions runs about one full day (24 hours).  This selection, featuring Alan Marks in a performance from the late 1980s, include 1/21st of the whole -- 40 repetitions -- in just under 70 minutes.

2. La Monte Young - The Well-Tuned Piano 81 X 25 6:17:50 - 11:18:59 PM NYC [Gramavision 79452, 1987]
For decades, La Monte Young kept his tuning system a closely guarded secret, until Kyle Gann sat down with a calculator and an adjustable synthesizer and worked it out [see "La Monte Young's The Well-Tuned Piano," Perspectives of New Music 31: 1 (Winter 1993): 134-162]. Whether or not you understand the structure of perfect fifths and pure minor sevenths, or exactly what is improvised and what is structured, just one hour of the multi-hour extension quickly suspends time. This recording is from the 5-CD Gramavision set, with the composer at the keyboard, recorded in late October, 1981.

3. Eliane Radigue - Kyema: Intermediate States [XI 103, 1991]
Eliane Radigue's Kyema, from her Trilogie de Mort for analogue Arp synthesizer. Taking its inspiration from the Tibetan Book of the Dead, the six intermediate states are: Kyene (Birth), Milam (Dream), Samten (Contemplation), Chikai (Death), Chonye (Clear Light), Sippai (Becoming)

4. A snippet of Leif Inge's Beethoven Stretch

5. [http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yMqgPsdq9WU]
Two hours of a youtube video stretching the Flight of the Bumblebee to over nine thousand percent its original length. Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov's "Flight of the Bumblebee" is excerpted from Act III of the opera Tsar Saltan, and has recently inspired musicians to perform the work too quickly (world record speed guitar playing in 2008 and 2011, by Tiago Della Vega and John Taylor, respectively; Canadian violinists in 2010 and 2011 by Oliver Lewis and the aptly named Eric Speed, respectively) but this version goes in the opposite direction, taking what others have performed in a minute as the source for a one-hundred-and-thirty minute drone. The same poster, "hollohill" also has a file of a Rick Roll extended by almost as much.

Craig Dworkin is the author of Dure (Cuneiform, 2004), Strand (Roof, 2005), and Parse (Atelos, forthcoming). A suite of his poetry in translation was featured in Pleine Marge (no. 39). He teaches at the University of Utah, where he also edits The UbuWeb Anthology of Conceptual Writing and Eclipse. http://www.ubu.com/concept/


SAT 3 MARCH: 11.52AM

THE LONG NOW FOUNDATION: BREWSTER KAHLE – UNIVERSAL ACCESS TO ALL KNOWLEDGE
As founder and librarian of the storied Internet Archive (deemed impossible by all when he started it in 1996), Brewster Kahle has practical experience behind his universalist vision of access to every bit of knowledge ever created, for all time, ever improving.

In this lecture he discusses: Can we make a distributed web of books that supports vending and lending? How can our machines learn by reading these materials? Can we reconfigure the information to make interactive question answering machines? Can we learn from past human translations of documents to seed an automatic version? And, can we learn how to do optical character recognition by having billions of correct examples? What compensation systems will best serve creators and networked users? How do we preserve petabytes of changing data? http://longnow.org/seminars/02011/nov/30/universal-access-all-knowledge/

Courtesy of the Long Now Foundation. http://longnow.org/


SAT 3 MARCH: 1.30PM

CHARLIE: BUSY DOING NOTHING – SLOW PIANO SHOW – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
Long pieces, slowly evolving structures, non-Western musical traditions, primitivism, and minimalism.  No sonatas. (Charlie Lewis)

Charlie Lewis has been compiling music since he got a tape recorder at age eight, but it was not until his involvement with WFMU that he was able to foist his musical conglomerations on the public at large. He has been doing just that, both at that beacon of freeform radio and at other stations, and also for fashion shows and such, since 1996. He has played in various combos (http://bit.ly/tiWSoW), and written lots of music (http://bit.ly/tZEy2g), but has yet to outdo this work (http://bit.ly/vqiV0f).  Charlie worked in broadcast audio and in the music business for many years, but now does the more honest work of selling patent medicine. http://wfmu.org/playlists/CL
http://beingslowlynowhere.typepad.com/

PLAYLIST
bed: Phillip Glass - Wichita Sutra Vortex - Solo Piano
Burmese Ensemble - Powerful King of Thunder and Lightning - White Elephants and Golden Ducks: Enchanting Musical Treasures from Burma
Steve Reich - Octet - Music for a Large Ensemble/Octet
bed: Runaways UK - Piano Toon - Classic Tales
Stravinsky - Augurs of Spring (2-piano arrangement) - Context 70 (various artists)
George Antheil - Sonata No. 1 for Piano and Violin, Fourth Movement - Music for Violin and Piano
Tom Johnson - The 2-, 3-, and 4-Part Chords - The Chord Catalogue
bed: Phillip Glass - Wichita Sutra Vortex
Emahoy Tsegué-Maryam Guèbrou - The Homeless Wanderer - Ethiopiques 21
Jeanne Lee and Ran Blake - Laura - The Legendary Duets
bed: Paul Dasken - Busy Day - Speckled Ax
Gyorgi Ligeti - Musica Ricercata II - Eyes Wide Shut (soundtrack)
Margaret Leng-Tan - Alvin Lucier: Nothing Is Real (Strawberry Fields) - Ghosts And Monsters: Technology And Personality
In Contemporary Music
Aki Takahashi - Guy Klucevsek: Monk's Intermezzo (I Want You) - Norwegian Wood: Hyper Music from Lennon and
McCartney
bed: Runaways UK - Piano Toon
Morton Feldman - Piece for Four Pianos - The Early Years


SAT 3 MARCH: 3.03PM

RADIO BOREDCAST: EARWORMS PART 1
Earworms is a show made by Vicki Bennett for Radio Boredcast addressing the ongoing problem of the Earworm. An earworm is a tune, a song, some sound that you get stuck in your head for hours, days... YEARS...

Vicki asked a few friends to share their "favourite" earworms. You might come away from this show with a little present from us. http://peoplelikeus.org

SAT 3 MARCH: 4.04PM

CLAY PIGEON: THE CORPULANT BRITISHER
Of the many amazing characters featured on The Dusty Show with Clay Pigeon, The Corpulant Britisher certainly knows how to take his time. http://www.wfmu.org/playlists/CP 


SAT 3 MARCH: 4.12PM

DAVE SOLDIER AND KOMAR & MELAMID: THE PEOPLE’S CHOICE MUSIC
With the collaboration of composer Dave Soldier, Komar & Melamid's Most Wanted Painting project was extended into the realm of music. A poll, written by Dave Soldier, was conducted on Dia's web site in Spring 1996. Approximately 500 visitors took the survey. Dave Soldier and Nina Mankin used the survey results to write music and lyrics for the Most Wanted and Most Unwanted songs.

The Most Wanted Song: a musical work that will be unavoidably and uncontrollably “liked” by 72 ± 12% of listeners. The Most Unwanted Song: fewer than 200 individuals of the world’s total population will enjoy this.

This survey confirms the hypothesis that today’s popular music indeed provides an accurate estimate of the wishes of the vox populi. The most favored ensemble, determined from a rating by participants of their favorite instruments in combination, comprises a moderately sized group (three to ten instruments) consisting of guitar, piano, saxophone, bass, drums, violin, cello, synthesizer, with low male and female vocals singing in rock/r&b style. The favorite lyrics narrate a love story, and the favorite listening circumstance is at home. The only feature in lyric subjects that occurs in both most wanted and unwanted categories is “intellectual stimulation.” Most participants desire music of moderate duration (approximately 5 minutes), moderate pitch range, moderate tempo, and moderate to loud volume, and display a profound dislike of the alternatives.

The most unwanted music is over 25 minutes long, veers wildly between loud and quiet sections, between fast and slow tempos, and features timbres of extremely high and low pitch, with each dichotomy presented in abrupt transition. The most unwanted orchestra was determined to be large, and features the accordion and bagpipe (which tie at 13% as the most unwanted instrument), banjo, flute, tuba, harp, organ, synthesizer (the only instrument that appears in both the most wanted and most unwanted ensembles). An operatic soprano raps and sings atonal music, advertising jingles, political slogans, and “elevator” music, and a children's choir sings jingles and holiday songs. The most unwanted subjects for lyrics are cowboys and holidays, and the most unwanted listening circumstances are involuntary exposure to commercials and elevator music. Therefore, it can be shown that if there is no covariance—someone who dislikes bagpipes is as likely to hate elevator music as someone who despises the organ, for example—fewer than 200 individuals of the world's total population would enjoy this piece.
(Dave Soldier, June 1997) http://www.davesoldier.com

 

SAT 3 MARCH: 4.37PM

JEROEN VAN VEEN: GLASS – OPENING FROM GLASSWORKS


SAT 3 MARCH: 4.50PM

CHANCE, ALEATORY OR OPEN FORM MUSIC: SELECTED BY ZEPELIM
A selection of works related to chance, aleatory or open form music from the UbuWeb archives. http://ubu.com/
John Cage - "Fontana Mix - Feed, Nov. 6, 1967" realized by Max Neuhaus
La Monte Young, editor "An Anthology of Chance Operations" 1963, PDF
Karlheinz Stockhausen - Plus-Minus realized by Paik from WBAI-FM "Avant Garde Concert III"
Faubion Bowers & Daniel Kunin - The Electronics of Music from Aspen no. 4, item 5
Marcel Duchamp - Erratum Musical (for three voices) from The Music of Marcel Duchamp, 1991
Gordon Mumma - Horn, a coulisse from antiquity in the guise of an objet trouvé from Aspen No. 4, item 6
Krzysztof Penderecki - Psalmus (1961) from 40 Years of Polish Experimental Radio from Studio Warsaw
Earle Brown - December 1952 Concert, 23th July 1964 from Internationales Musikinstitut
John Cage - "A Dip in the Lake" realized by Robert Pleshar
Joan La Barbara - 73 Poems Texts by Kenneth Goldsmith, 1993
David Behrman - Runthrough from The Sonic Arts Union, 1971
Janek Schaefer – Skate from Random Play Record, 2001
Mineko Grimmer  - Tower With Garden from Artsounds
Various - Fluxus Anthology.30th Anniversary 1962 – 1992
Hansjörg Mayer - Typoactionen (1972)

Carlo Patrao is a 27 year-old native of Coimbra, Portugal. He attended the University of Coimbra and has been working in radio since 2007. His education at RUC immersed him in the independent spirit of exclusively author-oriented radio programs free from the pressure of ratings, advertising, and profit-earning. Carlo began his radio career covering several areas of radiophonic activity, ranging from weekly shows featuring pop and folk music to more topical programs presenting cultural events, reviewing books and music, and promoting the work of local artists. In 2008, he created the program Zepelim with his friend Afonso Biscaia in order to explore the diverse possibilities of radiophonic space through the use of field recordings, experimental music, musique concrete, drones, archived sound and live improvisation. Episodes of Zepelim are 60-minute sound collages based on specific themes every month. The tracklists of sounds featured in each program are annotated in his bloghttp://zeppelinruc.wordpress.com/


SAT 3 MARCH: 9.24PM

DAVID TOOP: SLOW MUSIC – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
Slow music is only slow in a relative sense but there is a certain tempo, certainly slower than the norm, that has hypnotised me for more than 40 years. The body feels as if it runs at a certain pace but this is surely just a trick of perception – everything is moving according to different cycles, the most extreme of which contrast the passing now which has already gone with our infinitesimal place in the extendedness of the universe. I listen to this slow music (examples that have sustained me for almost a lifetime) in order to feel adjusted to the pace at which I feel most myself. (David Toop)

David Toop is a composer/musician, author and curator who has worked in many fields of sound art and music, including improvisation, sound installations, field recordings, pop music production, music for television, theatre and dance. He has published five books, including Ocean of Sound, Haunted Weather, and Sinister Resonance: The Mediumship of the Listener. Exhibitions he has curated include Sonic Boom at the Hayward Gallery, London.


SAT 3 MARCH: 11.28PM

KENNY G’S HOUR OF PAIN: SILENCE
http://www.wfmu.org/playlists/shows/36388

http://www.writing.upenn.edu/pennsound/x/Goldsmith.html

 

TOP

Radio Boredcast:
Day 3

Sat 3 March, 12am–12am
To listen click here
Read blog here

DAY 3 SCHEDULE: 

12.00am: Nicolas Collins: It Was A Dark and Stormy Night

12.26am: Old Shipping Forecast

12.48am: Jem Finer: Longplayer excerpt

6.49am: Wobbly and Andrea Williams: More Nature

7.55am: Dorian Jones: Toilets of Europe's Great Cultural Institutions

9.15am: Daniela Cascella: 31 Days, Slow and Still

9.17am: Analog Arts Ensemble: Beginning - ASLSP

9.42am: Peter Grudzien: Nothing

9.50am: People Like Us: Nothing

9.54am: Craig Dworkin: Paradoxically Quickening Effects from Time Slowing, Retarding, and Stretching.

11.52am: The Long Now Foundation: Brewster Kahle

1.30pm: Charlie: Busy Doing Nothing - Slow Piano Show

3.03pm: Radio Boredcast: Earworms Part 1 

4.04pm: Clay Pigeon: The Corpulant Britisher 

4.12pm: Dave Soldier and Komar & Melamid: The People's Choice Music 

4.37pm: Jeroen Van Veen: Glass - Opening from Glassworks

4.50pm: Zepelim: Chance, Aleatory or Open Form Music

9.24pm: David Toop: Slow Music

11.28pm: Kenny G's Hour of Pain: Silence