Zepelim

Radio Boredcast is archived at WFMU where you can listen to all 744-hours of this online radio project that ran continuously for the Festival month. WFMU is the longest-running freeform radio station in the US. Information about the programme schedule for this day is listed below. The Radio Boredcast archive can be listened to here.

TUE 27 MARCH: 12.00AM

ANNA RAMOS AND ROC JIMENEZ DE CISNEROS: FOUR CONSECUTIVE STEPS TOWARDS MIDDLE WORLD – PART 4 – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
These ultrasonic recordings of Vespertilionidae bat echolocation calls were made in the summer of 2011 using a CDB101R3 heterodyne stereo bat detector and a Tascam DR-100 digital recorder. The recordings were made in Parc de la Ciutadella in Barcelona.

Many overlapping pulse trains indicate groups of low flying bats feeding on insects – often just a few centimetres above head height. Those sections in which pulses do not overlap feature isolated bats flying in circles of about 15 meters in diameter. The frequency range of calls lies approximately between 35-60 KHz, and in some sections it is possible to hear other sound sources such as crickets, footsteps, people talking, or the fountain where the bats catch their prey.

The four shows in this series are based on the same recording, slowed down in each successive show in an attempt to reflect on the relativity of the concept of slowness and to try and transcend the anthropomorphic take on this subject. Middle World, a term coined by Richard Dawkins, is used to describe the realm between the microscopic world of quarks and atoms and the larger view of the universe at the galactic and universal level. This term is used as an explanation of oddity at both extreme levels of existence. http://alkualkualkualkualkualkualkualkualkualku.org


TUE 27 MARCH: 1.27AM

THE LONG NOW FOUNDATION: STEVEN JOHNSON AND THE LONG ZOOM
Nobody discovers or imparts an insight with the dexterity of Steven Johnson, author of Emergence, Everything Bad Is Good For You, and The Ghost Map. In this talk he examines how humanity is transformed by its new scaling capability - our ability now to examine and relate events at the nanometer and nanosecond scale and then zoom right out to a cosmic scale and time frame. With tools like Google Earth and Will Wright's "Spore" game, we all are learning to zoom with comfort. How does that change us?
http://longnow.org/seminars/02007/may/11/the-long-zoom/
Courtesy of the Long Now Foundation. http://longnow.org/


TUE 27 MARCH: 2.56AM

ZEPELIM: THE UNCANNY VALLEY
In 1970, roboticist Masahiro Mori coined the term “The Uncanny Valley” in the Japanese magazine “Energy”. From his experience in the field of designing human-like robots, he theorized that the more closely robots resemble human appearance and behavior, the more familiar they seem to be – up until the point where they seem almost-but-not-quite-real. At this point, their appearance and behavior triggers a negative human response, followed by feelings of eeriness or discomfort. Mori called this zone the “Uncanny Valley” because of the way a graph depicting the correlation between familiarity and human likeness would dip drastically just before reaching perfect mimicry of the human appearance. Scientists identified a diverse number of discrepancies that could explain this eeriness in a humanlike robot – for example, the timing of its speech, its gestures, or a lack of all the precise subtleties of a well-timed and natural social interaction. Freud referred to the first copies that humans made of ourselves with wooden and wax figures as an primitive attempt of humans to skirt death and secure a sense of immortality.  Are these scientific attempts to create the perfect robot a sophisticated denial of death?  In this episode of Zepelim, this intriguing and poetic concept is the basis of a sound exploration of the slow and fragile human quest to defy our perception of death through artificial life.  Recently, scientists from Geminoid Lab at Aalborg University have claimed that they have made an android that transcends the uncanny valley – the Geminoid-DK. 

Carlo Patrao is a 27 year-old native of Coimbra, Portugal. He attended the University of Coimbra and has been working in radio since 2007, when he became a member of the student-run radio station Rádio Universidade de Coimbra (RUC). His education at RUC immersed him in the independent spirit of exclusively author-oriented radio programs free from the pressure of ratings, advertising, and profit-earning. Carlo began his radio career covering several areas of radiophonic activity, ranging from weekly shows featuring pop and folk music to more topical programs presenting cultural events, reviewing books and music, and promoting the work of local artists. In 2008, he created the program Zepelim with his friend Afonso Biscaia in order to explore the diverse possibilities of radiophonic space through the use of field recordings, experimental music, musique concrete, drones, archived sound and live improvisation. Episodes of Zepelim are 60-minute sound collages based on specific themes every month. The tracklists of sounds featured in each program are annotated in his blog. In addition to his work at the radio, Carlo has a degree in Psychology and works as a therapist in the field of drug addiction. http://zeppelinruc.wordpress.com/2011/05/30/zepelim-uncanny-valley/


TUE 27 MARCH: 3.40AM

RADIO WEB MACBA PRESENTS – INTERRUPTIONS 4 – BREGMAN / DEUTSCH CHIMAERA – BY FLORIAN HECKER
Ràdio Web MACBA is the Museu d'art contemporani de Barcelona (MACBA) online radio project. http://rwm.macba.cat

Curated and produced by Florian Hecker.
The point of departure for this podcast comprises two publications from the mid nineties: 'Musical Illusions and Paradoxes' by Diana Deutsch and 'Demonstrations of Auditory Scene Analysis: The Perceptual Organization of Sound' by Albert S. Bregman and Pierre A. Ahad. These CDs feature demonstrations of the research in psychoacoustics (Bregman) and musical psychology (Deutsch) by their respective authors. Both volumes are introduced with a spoken commentary by the authors themselves and accompanied by extensive booklets that further describe what is heard as well as instructions and suggestions on parameters such as playback volume, loudspeaker position, distance from the same, and whether headphones are required or not. Here the recorded and textual components form a prescriptive double, a package where the listener verifies the CDs objectives though a subjective audible encounter.
http://rwm.macba.cat/en/curatorial/interruptions_4_florian_hecker/capsula


TUE 27 MARCH: 4.31AM

PHILL NIBLOCK: GUITAR TOO, FOR FOUR, TORAL VERSION
From G2,44+/-2


TUE 27 MARCH: 5.04AM

A MONTH IN THE BRAZILIAN RAINFOREST
Well, an hour actually.
Recording & engineering: Ruth Happel.


TUE 27 MARCH: 6.06AM

OTHER MINDS: RADIO EVENT – CHRYSANTHEMUM CHAMELEON
One in a series of groundbreaking, audience participatory, Radio Events, produced by KPFA in Berkeley California. In this, the 23rd program in the series, Alex Dea and a group of 25 singers, invited the listening audience of KPFA to come to the studio, or gather at their home with friends and with the radio on, and join them in an evening of meditative chanting. In “Piece I” everyone was instructed to sing at their lowest note and gradually move to their highest note using any vowel sounds starting with “Z” (Za, Zay, Zee, etc...). “Piece II” started with “OM”, then moved to rhythmic repetitions of syllables beginning with “CH” (Chak, Chawk, Cha, Chee, etc...), and then more rhythmic repetitions of syllables starting with the letter “D”. The end result was a calming, consciousness raising, event that united listeners across the San Francisco Bay Area and beyond. (June 7, 1973). http://www.archive.org/details/RE_1973_06_07
http://radiom.org


TUE 27 MARCH: 6.53AM

OLD SHIPPING FORECAST


TUE 27 MARCH: 6.57AM

KULANANDA – MINDFULNESS OF REALITY
In 'Mindfulness of Reality', the excellent Kulananda (Michael Chaskalson) brings a welcome compass to the maze of Buddhist teachings around the nature of existence itself. Impermanence, dependent arising, becoming, etc. - it's enough to make anyone think twice. Or a thousand times. And still get nowhere. But fear not - this is a clear, concise, eminently human and straightforward tour of the last of the traditional four levels of mindfulness. And Kulananda's approach is born of his experience of over twenty year's teaching on just this kind of thing. Ready? Then in we go...

Kulananda/Michael Chaskalson has published widely on many aspects of Buddhism and meditation, and runs a variety of mindfulness-based stress reduction programmes for use in personal and business life. Talk given at Cambridge Buddhist Centre, 2000
http://www.freebuddhistaudio.com

TUE 27 MARCH: 7.42AM

ALAN LAMB: MEDITATION ON SPRING 8
From Night Passage

TUE 27 MARCH: 7.58AM

OVER THE EDGE: HOW RADIO WAS DONE – PART 26
1967 flowers with the Beatles making the “Magical Mystery Tour” film and album, The Supremes and their Coke ad, John Cage and Morton Feldman discuss radio and silence, and back to San Francisco for the Human Be-In, The Diggers, and seminal bands playing for free in the street, including some dynamite live Moby Grape and Mother Earth.
Lots of music in this one. (December 21, 2006)

Over the Edge (or, OTE) is a sound collage radio program hosted and produced by Don Joyce. Joyce is also a member of the pioneering sound collage band Negativland, members of which frequently make guest appearances on Over the Edge. A series of Over the Edge episodes have been released under the Negativland name. http://www.negativland.com/ote/?p=337

Founded in 1981, OTE is broadcast live on KPFA in Berkeley, California, every second, third, and fourth Thursday morning from 12am to 3am. On the rare occasion of a month with a fifth Thursday OTE runs an additional two hours, from 12am to 5am. The show is also available on-line, streamed live from KPFA.org (where you can also podcast the show), or from Negativland.com, where many older episodes are available as well.


TUE 27 MARCH: 11.00AM

DANIELA CASCELLA: 31 DAYS, SLOW AND STILL

31 DAYS READING LE PONT MIRABEAU BY GUILLAUME APOLLINAIRE AT 8.30AM – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
Le pont Mirabeau is a poem by Guillaume Apollinaire, published in his 1913 collection Alcools. In response to the theme and the structure of As Slow As Possible/Radio Boredcast, I chose to record myself reading Le pont Mirabeau at 8.30 in the morning for 31 days, anticipating and mirroring the duration of the broadcast in a different place and at a different time.

I chose this poem because of its slow flowing against its slowing into stillness – the flow of water, time and words in the stanzas against the circularity of time in the refrain. The adjective ‘slow’ appears still in the third stanza, the same one that contains ‘love’, ‘hope’, ‘violent’. The adjective ‘still’ appears slow in the refrain, as an impossibility. In the original French poem, ‘slow’ rhymes with ‘violent’ and ‘still I stay’ with ‘hours’.

The lack of punctuation throughout the poem calls not only for a flow of words, but also for different rhythms and meanings arising out of each reading. The readings always took place in my office, sometimes as dedicated recordings, sometimes while I was preparing to go out, sometimes while I was reading the paper or checking the news online. I learned the poem by heart, so sometimes the recordings mirror my small hesitations and gaps in recalling the verses. An old phonograph recording of Apollinaire reading the poem (from the Archives de Parole, Collection Phonothèque Nationale - Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris) supported some of the readings.

Daniela Cascella is a writer and curator based in London since 2009. Her research is focused on sound and on the way it seeps into other formats, most of all text. Her most recent projects explore and employ fictional tropes in writing criticism and descriptions of sound in fiction. She has recently finished writing her third book, En abÎme: a narrative across listening, reading and writing-as-landscape, as part of her research in the MFA Art Writing at Goldsmiths College that she completed in 2011. http://www.danielacascella.com


TUE 27 MARCH: 11.04AM

KENNETH GOLDSMITH: THE WEATHER - SUMMER
Kenneth Goldsmith's writing has been called some of the most exhaustive and beautiful collage work yet produced in poetry by Publishers Weekly. Goldsmith is the author of ten books of poetry, founding editor of the online archive UbuWeb, and the editor I'll Be Your Mirror: The Selected Andy Warhol Interviews. From 1996-2009, Goldsmith was the host of a weekly radio show on New York City's WFMU. He teaches writing at The University of Pennsylvania, where he is a senior editor of PennSound, an online poetry archive. In 2011, he co-edited, Against Expression: An Anthology of Conceptual Writing and published a book of essays, Uncreative Writing: Managing Language in the Digital Age. In May 2011, he was invited to read at The White House for President and Mrs. Obama's "A Celebration of American Poetry." Goldsmith will participate in dOCUMENTA(13) in Kassel, Germany, 2012.
http://epc.buffalo.edu/authors/goldsmith/goldsmith_summer.html
http://www.writing.upenn.edu/pennsound/x/Goldsmith.html
http://www.ubu.com

 

TUE 27 MARCH: 12.01PM

OTHER MINDS: INTERVIEW WITH TERRY RILEY
Charles Amirkhanian interviews composer Terry Riley at his home in Northern California on June 11, 1983. Riley describes his early childhood experiences with music, his life as a student in San Francisco and his first experimentation with serial and then minimal composition. He goes into great detail about the processes that led to his seminal work "In C". Riley describes his early collaborations with others and his later tendency to work alone. Both Charles and Terry lament the fact that growing up in rural California there was little chance to be exposed to classical music. Riley also discusses his exploration of musical traditions from around the world, and in particular his affinity for Asian and Indian music and Eastern spiritual philosophies. Terry also discusses the influence that Pandit Pran Nath had on his life and music. (June 11, 1983) http://www.archive.org/details/AM_1983_06_11
http://radiom.org


TUE 27 MARCH: 1.24PM

TERRY RILEY: IN C


TUE 27 MARCH: 2.08PM

RADIO WEB MACBA PRESENTS: FONS AUDIO 7 – THE OTOLITH GROUP
Ràdio Web MACBA is the Museu d'art contemporani de Barcelona (MACBA) online radio project. http://rwm.macba.cat

The Otolith Group is an artists’ collective founded in London in 2000 by Anjalika Sagar and Kodwo Eshun. It takes its name from otoliths, the calcium crystals suspended in the endolymphatic fluid of the inner ear that help us balance and navigate through space. Through an eclectic range of materials (films, texts, documents, photographs, paintings, sound and music), The Otolith Group explores the nature of perception, and engages in the construction of new temporalities. Past, present and future are interspersed throughout the group’s work with the same intensity as reality and fiction, thus destabilising the dominant narratives of Western culture and indicating the inconsistencies of the post-colonial world. Theirs is a science fiction of the present, which recovers forgotten moments from history and projects them into the future. Sagar and Eshun’s work is best approached by putting aside the traditional methodological boundaries between creators, critics and curators. They create, analyse, interpret and reinterpret reality in an obsessive attempt to transcend the opacity of their images. To do so, they turn to the full range of semantic possibilities of montage and invite viewers to become editors of their works. http://rwm.macba.cat/en/specials/fons_audio_the_otolith_group/capsula 
Related info: http://rwm.macba.cat/uploads/20110510/Fons7_eng_PDF.pdf


TUE 27 MARCH: 2.29PM

KENNY G: INTELLIGENT DESIGN – DIRT – WITH KEN FREEDMAN
Kenny G and studio guest Ken Freedman discuss The Stooges. Gripping. First boredcast on WFMU.
http://www.wfmu.org/playlists/KG
http://www.wfmu.org/playlists/KF


TUE 27 MARCH: 5.00PM

DO OR DIY WITH PEOPLE LIKE US: BROKEN MUSIC – PART 2 – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
Broken Music is a 2 part series made specially for Radio Boredcast. Broken Music could mean a number of things - manipulation of the sound source (eg breaking or scratching a record or CD), cutting up or rearranging of the material - conceptually or literally, or treating or bending of the content so far that it becomes something else entirely.

DO or DIY is a freeform sound art radio show broadcast weekly by Vicki Bennett (People Like Us) on WFMU. The philosophy behind the show is simple. That within the realms of avant-garde and experimental sound art the goalposts defining "accessible" and "inaccessible" are constantly moving. As the radar rises and dips, fragments and shards of underground creations unearth, and popular culture and artist resonate, shifting shapes accordingly with one another in reflections of changing spotlights. Each show consists of collages made of sound works from the 20th and 21st century, often layered and looped many times over, resulting in an album type effect on each show. http://www.wfmu.org/peoplelikeus

PLAYLIST
Brion Gysin - In The Beginning Was The Word
Paul Lowry
Dsico - Can't Cut U Up
Noah Creshevsky - Strategic Defence Initiative
Scratch My Nose
Fennesz - Traxdata
Farmers Manual - dspKILL
Oval - Store Check
General Magic - Take The Bus
YOUR DJ SPEAKS - Anon (Java 1923) - Tedhak Saking (Central Javanese)
Johnny Pinkhouse - Track 15
Himuro - Play Until Dying
Z Rock - Scratch Party
Negativland - Yellow Black and Rectangular
Mutation - Norwogian Weed
Noah Creshevsky - Brother Tom
John Oswald - Field
YOUR DJ SPEAKS - Anon (Java 1923) - Tedhak Saking (Central Javanese
William Burroughs - Origin and Theory of the Tape Cut Ups
Philip Jeck, Martin Tétrault and Otomo Yoshihide - Untitled #1 (2000)
Johnny Pinkhouse - Track 17
John Oswald - WX09 


TUE 27 MARCH: 5.58PM

DAVE SOLDIER: MINUTE WALTZ VARIATIONS
From the Minute Waltz (Op 64, number 1, 1847, live performance August 21, 2010).

An old musician's joke is on the order of "it takes him twenty minutes to play the Minute Waltz". Here is a live performance of a collaboration with the late Frederic Chopin and living electronic musician Sean Hagerty. Dave Soldier performs the Minute Waltz on the grand piano at Le Poisson Rouge very very slowly, lasting more than twenty minutes, while Hagerty stretches the sound of each piano note out over time. Dave Soldier plays The Minute Waltz (Variation 1)
Variation 2. The average of all the notes is played Variation 3. All scale pitches are played except those that Chopin wrote
http://davesoldier.com/experimental.html#Chopin


TUE 27 MARCH: 6.30PM

GUDRUN GUT: SLOW SOUP – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
slow.
bloodpressure is low.
relatively. depending on circumstances.
faster than you think and slower than my heart.
actually around 90 bpm.
the set has parts of filmmusic i did recently and tuned down tracks from my solo live set as well as greie gut fraktion.
the mix is called slow soup.
stay slow.

Gudrun Gut is active in the music-scene since the 80ies, founding member of the bands Mania D, Malaria! and Matador. Since 1993 spoken word + performance project Miasma together with Myra Davies. Various record releases and live appearances. 1994 initiator of the Oceanclub, in 1997 she started her Label Monika Enterprise (Barbara Morgenstern, Cobra Killer etc) as well as producing and presenting the Oceanclub Radio Show for RadioEins Berlin together with Thomas Fehlmann. Since 2007 Solowork and worldwide solo performances, 2010/11 Greie Gut Fraktion "Baustelle" with Antye Greie (AGF). 2012 new album in production. http://www.gudrungut.com


TUE 27 MARCH: 7.13PM

JASON WILLETT: EDIT OF EVERYTHING – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
jupasupon wupillupett lupoves mupusupic upand dupucks .
jupasupon wupillupett lupoves smupokuping upand drupinkuping.
jupasupon wupillupett lupoves hupot supex upand hupot pupeppupers.
jupasupon wupillupett lupoves bupaltupimupore upand strupong cupoffupee.
jupasupon wupillupett lupoves frupiendshupip upand rupubbuper bupands.


TUE 27 MARCH: 8.14PM

MR ROTORVATOR: ANNOYED ABOUT NEXT DOOR – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
Mr Rotorvator (Adrian Phillips) studied horticulture in the early 90's and subsequently spent many hours breaking up old ground with the aforementioned machine in preparation for laying out new gardens. On rainy days he would find himself indoors, watching exercise videos or twiddling with his turntables and wondering, would a similar process work on his old record collection? Experimenting with various discs, he found that jamming the stylus at various points would produce interesting new rhythms. "I loved my old vinyl but was a bit bored with it too, what if I could chop up all the best bits from lots of different records and play them all at the same time, it's bound to sound great!" He was, of course, proved wrong but along the way some original sounds have been produced.


TUE 27 MARCH: 8.36PM

STEVEN BALL: N30
A binaural sound recording made at a number of stages along the route of the TUC march in London on 30 November 2011, presented as a subjective experience of being within the heart of the protesting crowd.

Steven Ball is an artist, writer and curator working mostly within film and video art related expanded audio-visual installation and performance. He has exhibited extensively in the UK, internationally, and on the internet. He is currently Research Fellow at Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design in London attached to British Artists' Film and Video Study Collection. http://www.steven-ball.net


TUE 27 MARCH: 9.09PM

LEIF ELGGREN: SHANGRI-LA SOUND – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
An attempt to open a teleport to Shangri-La. 

It was Christmas Eve and I was twelve years old. I had gone with my family to the country house to celebrate Christmas. It was cold and there was a lot of snow that year. We hardly ever spent Christmas at the country house, it was too uncomfortable, too much of a hassle to keep the fireplace and the tiled heaters going, but this year the grown-ups had decided that we were going to anyway. A lot of effort went into preparing Christmas: the food, the decorations, the presents – everything! We endured the ritual despite the lack of comfort and, late at night, sat down to watch TV. An old black-and-white film called ‘Lost Horizon’ was on. I settled into my chair, my expectations weren’t particularly high, but what else was there to do in this primitive situation. The grown-ups were busy with something, trying to keep spirits high. I became absorbed in the film, which got increasingly interesting as it developed. It was set in China in 1935, with the Japanese invading the country and a group of Americans trying to flee the country in a refugee plane. Once they are airborne it turns out that the plane is being piloted by Asians and headed for an unknown destination. It ends up crashing in a Tibet-like area, high up among snow-clad mountains. The Western passengers survive, while the Asian pilots die in the crash. Dressed only in hats, coats and dresses, the survivors try to get to grips with their icy predicament. Disaster seems threateningly close. Pretty soon, however, a group of fur-clad natives turns up. They appear to know what they’re doing, and offer to help. The prospect of a monastery, not too far away, beckons. A long, dangerous and difficult journey begins. The wind and snow beats against their faces, dangerous precipices suddenly appear, avalanches lie in wait. The group makes it around a windswept rocky outcrop, like a threshold, a passageway, and suddenly a protected valley appears, a virginal place where the sun always shines and everything is all right. The enraptured Westerners, feeling happy and safe, look down over the wonderful place, a place called Shangri-La – but here my watching abruptly ends. Having been totally absorbed by the film, I haven’t noticed that the rest of the family has been discussing our stay at the country house and their worries about it; now they have packed everything again and are about to return home to the civilization. The TV is turned off, I have no choice but to head out to the waiting, heated cars and leave. I am deeply disappointed. I would really have liked to see the end of the film, but there is nothing I can do.

Twenty-four years later I got the chance to see the whole film: it was again being shown on TV, and this time I was better prepared, more in control of the circumstances. I found out that ‘Lost Horizon’ was a film by Frank Capra, from 1937 (based on a novel with the same name from 1933 by James Hilton). It was a bewildering experience finally to see it to the end, after all those years. I have seen it again countless times since. I haven’t been able to let go of it, there is a connection between the film and my life, a connection between a certain scene in the film and a certain occurrence in my personal history, there is a parallelism, a threshold value. There is also, in the film, a dream as old as humanity, realized for the screen in a gigantic cold-storage space outside Los Angeles. The dream of a place, a condition, in which good is made manifest and offers security, shelter and solace amid the existential angst of the everyday. What remains as the crucial moment in the film is of course when the small group of people crosses the threshold to Shangri-La, when the windblown life on the other side is exchanged for the calm and warmth that envelops them when they have crossed over, passed the rocky outcrop. It is, of course, the most important moment in the film, the most important moment in life. The crossing, when the transformation happens. This has not left me any peace of mind, and in various contexts I have returned to this image of the passageway, the threshold, as a starting point, and in this case as an existing model in a Hollywood production. When I am now making what I call an attempt to open a teleport to Shangri-La, I am using the film and its story as a starting point. Can we use these basic aids to bring about a breakthrough? Art is a universal and amazing tool with whose help we can make miracles happen.

FROM ONE ROOM TO ANOTHER. To create the basic conditions for a transition.

The source material is Frank Capra’s film ‘Lost Horizon’ from 1937. A very short sequence, only two or three seconds in the original film, has been enlarged and taken apart into a selection of a few images. These images have been put together to generate a loop. In the same way a very short sequence of the sound has been picked out and stretched out to more than 40 minutes. An attempt to stay as long as possible at this short but so important threshold in the film, when the group of tired and frozen people are passing the border to Shangri-La. Trying to set up an arrangement for escape, an exit for anguish and a focal point for the contradiction of fear. Trying to use this powerful sequence as a tool for a possible transition. (Leif Elggren, Stockholm February 5th, 2002).


TUE 27 MARCH: 9.57PM

NANCY O GRAHAM: SOMNILOQUY CYCLE – FRIENDS, SOMETIMES
Based on texts from A Friend Is Someone Who Likes You, by Joan Walsh Anglund.

Nancy Oarneire Graham creates somniloquies, or recorded sleeptalk, by repetitively reading a short text—whether from a children's story, a work of nonfiction, or her own dreams—until she begins to fall half asleep. In the twilight state between waking and sleeping, known as the hypnagogic state, visions, half-formed thoughts, and stray words begin to interrupt those read from the page, opening a window onto this borderland.

1. HERE A CHILD CYCLES IN SLEEP

The wind can be a friend, too. It sings soft songs to you at night when you are sleepy and feeling lonely. Sometimes it calls to you to play. It pushes you from behind as you walk and makes the leaves dance for you. It is always with you wherever you go, and that’s how you know it likes you.
—A Friend Is Someone Who Likes You, by Joan Walsh Anglund

This recording was done in bed with my children. It opens with me reading a Halloween story called A Very Scary Ghost Story, by Joanne Barkan. Then I read the full text of A Friend Is Someone Who Likes You by Joan Walsh Anglund, choose an excerpt to use for the somniloquy, and begin the somniloquy.

2. IS OR COULD BE

A friend is someone who likes you. It can be a boy... It can be a girl ... or a cat ... or a dog ... or even a white mouse.
—A Friend Is Someone Who Likes You, by Joan Walsh Anglund

3. ADEQUATE TO THE JERK

Sometimes you don't know who are your friends. Sometimes they are there all the time, but you walk right past them and don't notice that they like you in a special way.
—A Friend Is Someone Who Likes You, by Joan Walsh Anglund

4. A BROOK TALKS TO YOU

A brook can be a friend in a special way.  It talks to you with splashy gurgles.  It cools your toes and lets you sit quietly beside it when you don’t feel like speaking.
—A Friend Is Someone Who Likes You, by Joan Walsh Anglund

5. A TREE FRIEND

A tree can be a different kind of friend. It doesn’t talk to you, but you know it likes you, because it gives you apples ... Or pears ... Or cherries ... Or, sometimes, a place to swing.
—A Friend Is Someone Who Likes You, by Joan Walsh Anglund

6. AND THEN YOU THINK

And then you think you don’t have any friends. Then you must stop hurrying and rushing so fast ... and move very slowly, and look around carefully, to see someone who smiles at you in a special way...
—A Friend Is Someone Who Likes You, by Joan Walsh Anglund

7.  WHERE DID YOU FIND YOURS?

Sometimes you have to find your friend. Some people have lots and lots of friends ... and some people have quite a few friends ... but everyone ... Everyone in the whole world has at least one friend. Where did you find yours?
—A Friend Is Someone Who Likes You, by Joan Walsh Anglund

Nancy Oarneire Graham's somniloquy-based poems and prose have appeared in print and online publications, including BlazeVOX, Café Irreal, Chronogram, Eratio, Invisible City, New Verse News, Pindeldyboz, Prima Materia, Listening in Dreams (by Carol Ione), and Water Writes (edited by Larry Carr). She has performed somniloquies as part of the Deep Listening Institute's Dream Festival in Kingston, New York. Her chapbook, somniloquies, is available from Pudding House Publications. http://ngram.net/

 

TOP

Radio Boredcast:
Day 27

Tue 27 March, 12am-12am
To listen click here
Read blog here

DAY 27 SCHEDULE: 

12.00am: Anna Ramos and Roc Jiménez de Cisneros: Four consecutive steps towards Middle World - Part 4 

1.27am: The Long Now Foundation: Steven Johnson and The Long Zoom

2.56am: Zepelim: The Uncanny Valley

3.40am: Radio Web MACBA Presents: Interruptions 4 - Bregman / Deutsch Chimaera - By Florian Hecker

4.31am: Phill Niblock: Guitar Too, For Four, Toral Version

5.04am: A Month in The Brazilian Rainforest

6.06am: Other Minds: Radio Event - Chrysanthemum Chameleon

6.53am: Old Shipping Forecast

6.57am: Kulananda - Mindfulness of Reality

7.42am: Alan Lamb: Meditation on Spring 8

7.58am: Over The Edge: How Radio Was Done - 26

11.00am: Daniela Cascella: 31 Days, Slow and Still

11.04am: Kenneth Goldsmith: The Weather - Summer

12.01pm: Other Minds: Interview with Terry Riley

1.24pm: Terry Riley: In C

2.08pm: Radio Web MACBA Presents: Fons Àudio 7 - The Otolith Group

2.29pm: Kenny G: Intelligent Design - Dirt - with Ken Freedman

5.00pm: DO or DIY with People Like Us: Broken Music - Part 2

5.58pm: Dave Soldier: Minute Waltz Variations

6.30pm: Gudrun Gut: Slow Soup

7.13pm: Jason Willett: Edit of Everything

8.14pm: Mr Rotorvator: Annoyed About Next Door

8.36pm: Steven Ball: N30

9.09pm: Leif Elggren: Shangri-La Sound

9.57pm: Nancy O Graham: Somniloquy Cycle - Friends, Sometimes