"Arranging for an opening of a teleport to Shangri-la" by Leif Elggren

Radio Boredcast is archived at WFMU where you can listen to all 744-hours of this online radio project that ran continuously for the Festival month. WFMU is the longest-running freeform radio station in the US. Information about the programme schedule for this day is listed below. The Radio Boredcast archive can be listened to here.

TUE 20 MARCH: 12.02AM

NICK THE BARD SINGS MIDNIGHT AT THE OASIS
http://blog.wfmu.org/freeform/2006/07/nick_the_bard_v.html


TUE 20 MARCH: 12.05AM

PANDIT PRAN NATH: MIDNIGHT


TUE 20 MARCH: 12.52AM

HANS REICHEL: ARRIVAL OF THE MIDNIGHT QUEEN
From Lower Lurum


TUE 20 MARCH: 12.55AM

NIGHT RECORDINGS FROM BALI: MIDNIGHT - PLUMAGE


TUE 20 MARCH: 12.58AM

ANNA RAMOS AND ROC JIMENEZ DE CISNEROS: FOUR CONSECUTIVE STEPS TOWARDS MIDDLE WORLD – PART 3 – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
These ultrasonic recordings of Vespertilionidae bat echolocation calls were made in the summer of 2011 using a CDB101R3 heterodyne stereo bat detector and a Tascam DR-100 digital recorder. The recordings were made in Parc de la Ciutadella in Barcelona.

Many overlapping pulse trains indicate groups of low flying bats feeding on insects – often just a few centimetres above head height. Those sections in which pulses do not overlap feature isolated bats flying in circles of about 15 meters in diameter. The frequency range of calls lies approximately between 35-60 KHz, and in some sections it is possible to hear other sound sources such as crickets, footsteps, people talking, or the fountain where the bats catch their prey.

The four shows in this series are based on the same recording, slowed down in each successive show in an attempt to reflect on the relativity of the concept of slowness and to try and transcend the anthropomorphic take on this subject. Middle World, a term coined by Richard Dawkins, is used to describe the realm between the microscopic world of quarks and atoms and the larger view of the universe at the galactic and universal level. This term is used as an explanation of oddity at both extreme levels of existence. http://alkualkualkualkualkualkualkualkualkualku.org


TUE 20 MARCH: 1.57AM

LA MONTE YOUNG: THE TURTLE HIS DREAMS AND JOURNEYS
From Theatre of Eternal Music


TUE 20 MARCH: 2.21AM

FRANK BRINK: SOUNDS OF ALASKA
Sounds of Alaska was designed to present meaningful and outstanding impressions of Alaska. The selection of these impressions was based on their appeal to Alaskans as well as to the many visitors who might never be able to stay in Alaska long enough to know the sources from which Sounds of Alaska were derived. This recording does not attempt to present a comprehensive picture, nor even the most important aspects of life in Alaska. It is not a historical account, nor does it attempt to follow a geographical, or historical pattern. It does however, attempt to preserve some of the feeling of old Alaska before radio, TV, and modern transportation, a feeling which is alive now only in the memories of the old timers. It introduces to new Alaskans authentic impressions of character of some of the people known and unknown who have either made a significant contribution to the growth of Alaska, or who have made life more colorful during their moment in the "great land".  From the back cover, written in the late 1950s.

TRACKS
1. George Ahgupuk Introduces "Sounds of Alaska"
2. Fairbanks, gold town, big city
3. Nome, the gold rush city
4. Alaskan Dog Mushers
5. The Legendary Alaskan Bush Pilots
6. Kotzebue Eskimos
7. The Seal Islands - The Pribilofs
8. The Breakup of Lake George
9. Anaktuvik Eskimos (one of the oldest intact Eskimo tribes in the world)
10. Fort Yukon - Athabacan Indians
11. Climbing Mt. McKinley
12. Juneau, capitol of Alaska.


TUE 20 MARCH: 3.02AM

MAC: SLOW – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
Michael Cumella (aka MAC) is an antique phonograph DJ performing on radio and for LIVE events with 100+year old crank-up phonographs http://michaelcumella.com/phonographdj/index.html. MAC also collects unusual record formats that can be seen in his "virtual museum" http://www.wfmu.org/MACrec/. He is also a video specialist working in and living in New York City. http://www.wfmu.org/playlists/AP


TUE 20 MARCH: 5.49AM

OLD SHIPPING FORECAST


TUE 20 MARCH: 6.01AM

TIM MALONEY: MR SUGGS’S SHINY BEETLE HAT – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
MSSBH began life as a turgid short story, written in an attempt to prove that a certain brand of screenwriting software was actually crap. It was, and so was the story, which no one would read, regardless of the amount offered. This new presentation, however, is bound to be the smash hit on radio I have always wanted.  A little known fact about this piece is that it is entirely composed of birdsong, painstakingly recorded and edited, stretched, squeezed, modified, and modulated to sound like "synthesizers," "drums" and even "a narrator."  Even more amazing is that it consists only of the songs of common sparrows found outside my window when I am feeling melancholy.  Perhaps the most startling, amazing, and downright awesome wicked aspect is that encoded in between the birdsong are secret subliminal instructions, which if all goes according to plan, will mobilize a good quarter of the listening audience (+/- 12% standard deviation) into my zombie apocalypse army.  WHICH YOU CANNOT STOP.

Tim Maloney is an American filmmaker and animator who has made films for the band Negativland, the Walt Disney Company, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, to name the strangest bedfellows. His work has been screened at the PFA, SF MOMA, the ICA, MIT, and many other venues. http://www.nakedrabbit.com


TUE 20 MARCH: 6.38AM

KENNETH KIRSCHNER: MARCH 20, 2007
http://www.kennethkirschner.com/


TUE 20 MARCH: 6.55AM

PARAMANANDA: A BODY AWARENESS AND RELAXATION MEDITATION
Change Your Mind by Paramananda was one of the best-selling meditation books produced by the FWBO. Paramananda's considerable experience of meditation and in social work led him to an approach to sitting practice that tried to take account of the whole person, body and 'soul'. Judging by the popularity of his teaching he seems to have hit on something vital to forming an enduring positive relationship with meditation as a way to transform your sense of self and of life. Paramananda recorded taped audio guides to meditation for Dharmachakra in 1998, intended to complement his book.
http://www.freebuddhistaudio.com


TUE 20 MARCH: 7.17AM

RADIO BOREDCAST PRESENTS… INDIAN RAGA SELECTION
Throughout the month, Radio Boredcast is making selections of themed music that fit the As Slow As Possible subject, either in an obvious or more ethereal way.  What I like about the raga is it is a series of notes arranged and rearranged in very methodical ways, reflective of the time of day, the season, and so on... very much in tune with the theme of Slowness in that it reflects time and repetition.


TUE 20 MARCH: 8.05AM

CHARLIE: BUSY DOING NOTHING – SLOW WORDS AND WHAT NOT – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
Getting lost in a swirl of words in a variety of languages, real and otherwise. Words spoken, declaimed, sung, monologues, shaggy dog stories, childhood reflections. 

Charlie Lewis has been compiling music since he got a tape recorder at age eight, but it was not until his involvement with WFMU that he was able to foist his musical conglomerations on the public at large. He has been doing just that, both at that beacon of freeform radio and at other stations, and also for fashion shows and such, since 1996. He has played in various combos (http://bit.ly/tiWSoW), and written lots of music (http://bit.ly/tZEy2g), but has yet to outdo this work (http://bit.ly/vqiV0f).  Charlie worked in broadcast audio and in the music business for many years, but now does the more honest work of selling patent medicine. http://wfmu.org/playlists/CL
http://beingslowlynowhere.typepad.com/

PLAYLIST
Words and what-not (90 minutes):
bed: John Lurie - Car Cleveland - Stranger Than Paradise (soundtrack)
Bruce Nauman - World Peace (Bernard) - Raw Materials
Theatre du Chene Noir - Hey - Chant pour le delta, la lune et le soleil
Mihaly Vig - Kész az egész, from Kárhozat (Damnation) - Music from the Films of Bela Tarr
Pizzicato Five - Porno 3003 - Happy End of the World
bed: Vladimir Cosma - Sentimental Walk - Diva (soundtrack)
Solveig Dommartin - monologue from Wings of Desire (Wim Wenders, director)
Ikue Asazaki - Obokuri-Eeumi - Utabautayun (used in Samurai Champloo, episode 14)
Marvin Pontiac (John Lurie) - Small Car - The Legendary Marvin Pontiac: Greatest Hits
Bruce Nauman - World Peace (Mei Mei) - Raw Materials
bed: Ennio Morricone - L'assoluto naturale - Eviva! Morricone
Emmett Williams - Cellar Song - Tellus 24: FluxTellus
Nobukazu Takemura - Obaoba (Aki Tsuyuko, vocal) - Songbook
Todd Levin - Swirl – DeLuxe
bed: John Lurie - Car Cleveland


TUE 20 MARCH: 9.36AM

RADIO WEB MACBA PRESENTS SON[I]A 132: INTERVIEW WITH THEO BURT
Ràdio Web MACBA is the Museu d'art contemporani de Barcelona (MACBA) online radio project. http://rwm.macba.cat

Theo Burt is a UK-based artist working with sound, video and light. His work draws on interests in perceptual relationships between sound and image and aesthetic applications of technology. Burt’s recent projects have focused on the use of related sound and video to create a transparency of process, and the effect of partial-predictability on perceptions of time. His work includes installations, live performances and fixed-media pieces. Son[i]a talks to Theo Burt about perceptual processes, visual music and intermedia art. http://rwm.macba.cat/en/sonia/theo_burt/capsula

 

TUE 20 MARCH: 9.53AM

RADIO BOREDCAST PRESENTS… MNMLISM
Throughout the month, Radio Boredcast is making selections of themed music that fit the As Slow As Possible subject, either in an obvious or more ethereal way.  Here is a selection of minimalist music, both from the era when it was most popular, but also some other tracks that have similar qualities.


TUE 20 MARCH: 11.53AM

DANIELA CASCELLA: 31 DAYS, SLOW AND STILL

31 DAYS READING LE PONT MIRABEAU BY GUILLAUME APOLLINAIRE AT 8.30AM – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
Le pont Mirabeau is a poem by Guillaume Apollinaire, published in his 1913 collection Alcools. In response to the theme and the structure of As Slow As Possible/Radio Boredcast, I chose to record myself reading Le pont Mirabeau at 8.30 in the morning for 31 days, anticipating and mirroring the duration of the broadcast in a different place and at a different time.

I chose this poem because of its slow flowing against its slowing into stillness – the flow of water, time and words in the stanzas against the circularity of time in the refrain. The adjective ‘slow’ appears still in the third stanza, the same one that contains ‘love’, ‘hope’, ‘violent’. The adjective ‘still’ appears slow in the refrain, as an impossibility. In the original French poem, ‘slow’ rhymes with ‘violent’ and ‘still I stay’ with ‘hours’.

The lack of punctuation throughout the poem calls not only for a flow of words, but also for different rhythms and meanings arising out of each reading. The readings always took place in my office, sometimes as dedicated recordings, sometimes while I was preparing to go out, sometimes while I was reading the paper or checking the news online. I learned the poem by heart, so sometimes the recordings mirror my small hesitations and gaps in recalling the verses. An old phonograph recording of Apollinaire reading the poem (from the Archives de Parole, Collection Phonothèque Nationale - Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris) supported some of the readings.

Daniela Cascella is a writer and curator based in London since 2009. Her research is focused on sound and on the way it seeps into other formats, most of all text. Her most recent projects explore and employ fictional tropes in writing criticism and descriptions of sound in fiction. She has recently finished writing her third book, En abÎme: a narrative across listening, reading and writing-as-landscape, as part of her research in the MFA Art Writing at Goldsmiths College that she completed in 2011. www.danielacascella.com


TUE 20 MARCH: 12.00PM

ROB WEISBERG: WORLD VOCAL MUSIC – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
For this hour of the Boredcast, I’ve selected fifteen slow-moving songs or pieces centered on the human voice, sometimes a cappella, sometimes with drone, ambient or otherwise low-key or understated accompaniment. All of these pieces have roots in traditional music or contain traditional elements from Europe and Asia. But many blend elements of the traditional and the modern; with the exception of the selection from Buddhist monks in Bhutan, none of these are not ethnographic field recordings.

PLAYLIST
1 Korean Creative Music Society - Dongdasong from Various Artists: Into the Light II (MCST)
2 Monks of Tashicho Dzong, Thimphu; Nuns of Punakha Dzong (Bhutan) - Chakchen Sondep
(Petition To Chakchen) from Various Artists (recorded by John Levy): Tibetan Buddhist Rites from the Monasteries of Bhutan (Lyrichord)
3 Huun Huur Tu and Carmen Rizzo - Tuvan Prayer from Eternal (Six Degrees)
4 Wulu Bunun singers and David Darling – Pasibutbut from Mudanin Kata (World Music Network)
5 Sainkho Namtchylak - Last Christmas from Various Artists (edited By Morgan Fischer) -Miniatures II
6 Bulgarian Voices - Angelite & Huun-Huur-Tu - Fly, Fly My Sadness from Fly, Fly My Sadness (Shanachie)
7 Yerevan Women's Choir of Armenia - Surb, Surb from Yerevan Women's Choir of Armenia (MEG)
8 Rustavi Choir (Georgia) - Kakhuri Nana from World Network, Vol. 2: Georgia [Georgian Polyphony] (Network Meridien)
9 Alanna O'Kelly - One Breath from Various Artists: Lament (Real World)
10 Sheila Chandra & Ganges Orcestra - Not Waving, Droning from EEP 2 (Indipop)
11 Yungchen Lhamo - Fade Way from Ama (Real World)
12 Mari Boine - Ahccai (To My Father) from In the Hand of the Night (Universal)
13 Sussan Deyhim - Beshno Az Ney (Windfall) from City of Leaves (Venus Rising)
14 Azam Ali - Neni Desem from From Night To The Edge Of Day (Six Degrees)
15 Loga Ramin Torkian - Avaaz from Mehraab (Six Degrees)

Rob Weisberg is the host of Transpacific Sound Paradise, the “peerless world music show” (Time Out New York) heard Saturday evenings on non-commercial radio station WFMU. The program features recorded and live music, interviews, and remote broadcasts from Barbes, a performance venue in Brooklyn and occasionally other venues. The noted abstract painter Mary Heilmann was inspired to name one of her works after the show, Transpacific (2007) and Rob’s voice from the show has been heard in two documentary films. Rob’s obsessively-maintained online world music calendar has become an essential resource for NYC metro area world music fans.
http://www.wfmu.org/playlists/tp
http://www.timeout.com/newyork
http://www.barbesbrooklyn.com
http://www.hauserwirth.com/artists/12/mary-heilmann/biography
http://www.wfmu.org/world


TUE 20 MARCH: 1.00PM

IRENE MOON: LET’S TALK SCIENCE – THE ICE SHOW – IN CONVERSATION WITH CHRIS WATSON – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
Irene uses her entomological and scientific background to connect with individuals from the scientific community; discussing their perception of time on topics they are most intimate and familiar. http://www.begoniasociety.org

Chris Watson is one of the world's leading recorders of wildlife and natural phenomena for television documentary and musical collaborations. Our topic is ice at the end of the world and his impression of recording in Antarctica. http://www.chriswatson.net


TUE 20 MARCH: 2.01PM

JEROEN VAN VEEN: GLASS – MAD RUSH
From Minimal Piano Collection


TUE 20 MARCH: 2.17PM

JEM FINER: LONGPLAYER – EXCERPT – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
Jem Finer has made Radio Boredcast four 6-hour recordings of Longplayer to broadcast this month. Longplayer is a one thousand year long musical composition. It began playing at midnight on the 31st of December 1999, and will continue to play without repetition until the last moment of 2999, at which point it will complete its cycle and begin again. Conceived and composed by Jem Finer, it was originally produced as an Artangel commission, and is now in the care of the Longplayer Trust.

Longplayer can be heard in the lighthouse at Trinity Buoy Wharf, London, where it has been playing since it began. It can also be heard at several other listening posts around the world, and globally via a live stream on the Internet. Longplayer is composed for singing bowls – an ancient type of standing bell – which can be played by both humans and machines, and whose resonances can be very accurately reproduced in recorded form. It is designed to be adaptable to unforeseeable changes in its technological and social environments, and to endure in the long-term as a self-sustaining institution.
http://longplayer.org/

Jem Finer is a UK-based artist, musician and composer. Since studying computer science in the 1970s, he has worked in a variety of fields, including photography, film, experimental and popular music and installation. Among his other works is Score For a Hole In the Ground (2005), a permanent, self-sustaining musical installation in a forest in Kent which relies only on gravity and the elements to be audible. He is currently working on a number of new projects continuing his interest in long-term sustainability and the reconfiguring of older technologies.


TUE 20 MARCH: 8.18AM

LEIF ELGGREN: SHANGRI-LA SOUND – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
An attempt to open a teleport to Shangri-La. 

It was Christmas Eve and I was twelve years old. I had gone with my family to the country house to celebrate Christmas. It was cold and there was a lot of snow that year. We hardly ever spent Christmas at the country house, it was too uncomfortable, too much of a hassle to keep the fireplace and the tiled heaters going, but this year the grown-ups had decided that we were going to anyway. A lot of effort went into preparing Christmas: the food, the decorations, the presents – everything! We endured the ritual despite the lack of comfort and, late at night, sat down to watch TV. An old black-and-white film called ‘Lost Horizon’ was on. I settled into my chair, my expectations weren’t particularly high, but what else was there to do in this primitive situation. The grown-ups were busy with something, trying to keep spirits high. I became absorbed in the film, which got increasingly interesting as it developed. It was set in China in 1935, with the Japanese invading the country and a group of Americans trying to flee the country in a refugee plane. Once they are airborne it turns out that the plane is being piloted by Asians and headed for an unknown destination. It ends up crashing in a Tibet-like area, high up among snow-clad mountains. The Western passengers survive, while the Asian pilots die in the crash. Dressed only in hats, coats and dresses, the survivors try to get to grips with their icy predicament. Disaster seems threateningly close. Pretty soon, however, a group of fur-clad natives turns up. They appear to know what they’re doing, and offer to help. The prospect of a monastery, not too far away, beckons. A long, dangerous and difficult journey begins. The wind and snow beats against their faces, dangerous precipices suddenly appear, avalanches lie in wait. The group makes it around a windswept rocky outcrop, like a threshold, a passageway, and suddenly a protected valley appears, a virginal place where the sun always shines and everything is all right. The enraptured Westerners, feeling happy and safe, look down over the wonderful place, a place called Shangri-La – but here my watching abruptly ends. Having been totally absorbed by the film, I haven’t noticed that the rest of the family has been discussing our stay at the country house and their worries about it; now they have packed everything again and are about to return home to the civilization. The TV is turned off, I have no choice but to head out to the waiting, heated cars and leave. I am deeply disappointed. I would really have liked to see the end of the film, but there is nothing I can do.

Twenty-four years later I got the chance to see the whole film: it was again being shown on TV, and this time I was better prepared, more in control of the circumstances. I found out that ‘Lost Horizon’ was a film by Frank Capra, from 1937 (based on a novel with the same name from 1933 by James Hilton). It was a bewildering experience finally to see it to the end, after all those years. I have seen it again countless times since. I haven’t been able to let go of it, there is a connection between the film and my life, a connection between a certain scene in the film and a certain occurrence in my personal history, there is a parallelism, a threshold value. There is also, in the film, a dream as old as humanity, realized for the screen in a gigantic cold-storage space outside Los Angeles. The dream of a place, a condition, in which good is made manifest and offers security, shelter and solace amid the existential angst of the everyday. What remains as the crucial moment in the film is of course when the small group of people crosses the threshold to Shangri-La, when the windblown life on the other side is exchanged for the calm and warmth that envelops them when they have crossed over, passed the rocky outcrop. It is, of course, the most important moment in the film, the most important moment in life. The crossing, when the transformation happens. This has not left me any peace of mind, and in various contexts I have returned to this image of the passageway, the threshold, as a starting point, and in this case as an existing model in a Hollywood production. When I am now making what I call an attempt to open a teleport to Shangri-La, I am using the film and its story as a starting point. Can we use these basic aids to bring about a breakthrough? Art is a universal and amazing tool with whose help we can make miracles happen.

FROM ONE ROOM TO ANOTHER. To create the basic conditions for a transition.

The source material is Frank Capra’s film ‘Lost Horizon’ from 1937.

A very short sequence, only two or three seconds in the original film, has been enlarged and taken apart into a selection of a few images. These images have been put together to generate a loop. In the same way a very short sequence of the sound has been picked out and stretched out to more than 40 minutes. An attempt to stay as long as possible at this short but so important threshold in the film, when the group of tired and frozen people are passing the border to Shangri-La. Trying to set up an arrangement for escape, an exit for anguish and a focal point for the contradiction of fear. Trying to use this powerful sequence as a tool for a possible transition. (Leif Elggren, Stockholm February 5th, 2002)


TUE 20 MARCH: 9.05PM

GWILLY EDMONDEZ: HOCKET – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
3 – HOCKET (Gwilly Edmondez – voice & Aiwa TPS-45 dictaphone)

Using lyrics and themes from the other three episodes, ‘Hocket’ deals in deals with what is commonly known as ‘singing in the round,’ except that it is a vocal performance recorded only once to cassette tape with a dictaphone which is then used as a playback device for a double-tracked, manipulated recording.  Strictly speaking, the resulting form is closer to canon, but when Gwilly started he was under the impression that canon and hocket were the same thing; he kept the working title because he liked the word better and, of course, it resists connotation.

Gwilly Edmondez has been making improvised music, composed music, collage and noise, officially, since co-founding Radioactive Sparrow in Bridgend, South Wales in 1980. Since 2004, in civilian life he has taught at the School of Arts & Cultures at Newcastle University. He currently performs and records as a solo artist and in multiple/multiplying group outfits. New work can be followed at the following locations:
http://feltbeak.tumblr.com
http://www.kakutopia.com
http://www.youtube.com/user/prducer
http://vimeo.com/gwillyedmondez
http://freemusicarchive.org/label/Kakutopia/

A selection of older work is also featured at UbuWeb:
http://www.ubu.com/sound/edmondez.html


TUE 20 MARCH: 9.57PM

DOUG HORNE: SLOWRADIO 1 – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
Doug Horne has been doing free-form radio and dabbling in audio art for the last 27 years at the radio stations CHRW, CKMS, and CFRU in Ontario Canada. His most curious achievement was curating the long-running and completely unknown audio-art show "Frequent Mutilations" on CKMS until it was over-run by cretin hordes in 2008. He has carried on audio art-based radio with the collaborative long-distance show "The Mannlicher Carcano Radio Hour" (his portion originating from CFRU in Guelph, Ontario).  In his spare time Doug is an academic librarian who lives with his family and 8 chickens in a shack surrounded by sculptures made of rusty metal, and hopes one day to have an old car on blocks in his yard.
http://frequent-mutilations.com/Frequent_Mutilations/Home.html

PLAYLIST
Glenn Gould - The Silence in the Land
Residents - Eskimo
Field Recordings - Kitchener, Ontario, Canada
Bill Munroe - Blue Moon of Kentucky
Ledbelly - In the Pines
Roosevelt Sykes - Sweet Old Chicago
Hiledegard Westerkamp - Attending to Sacred Matters
Lonnie Johnson - Long Road to Travel

TOP

Radio Boredcast:
Day 20

Tue 20 March, 12am-12am
To listen click here

Read blog here

DAY 20 SCHEDULE:

12.02am: Nick The Bard Sings Midnight At The Oasis

12.05am: Pandit Pran Nath: Midnight

12.52am: Hans Reichel: Arrival Of The Midnight Queen

12.55am: Night Recordings from Bali: Midnight - Plumage

12.58am: Anna Ramos and Roc Jiménez de Cisneros: Four consecutive steps towards Middle World - Part 3

1.57am: La Monte Young: The Turtle His Dreams and Journeys

2.21am: Frank Brink: Sounds of Alaska

3.02am: MAC: Slow

5.49am: Old Shipping Forecast

6.01am: Tim Maloney: Mr Suggs's Shiny Beetle Hat

6.38am: Kenneth Kirschner: March 20, 2007

6.55am: Paramananda: A Body Awareness and Relaxation Meditation

7.17am: Radio Boredcast Presents... Indian Raga Selection

8.05am: Charlie: Busy Doing Nothing - Slow Words and What Not

9.36am: Radio Web MACBA Presents Son[i]a 132: Interview with Theo Burt

9.53am: Radio Boredcast Presents... Mnmlism

11.53am: Daniela Cascella: 31 Days, Slow and Still

12.00pm: Rob Weisberg: World Vocal Music

1.00pm: Irene Moon: Let's Talk Science - The Ice Show - in Conversation with Chris Watson

2.01pm: Jeroen Van Veen: Glass - Mad Rush

2.17pm: Jem Finer: Longplayer - excerpt

8.18pm: Leif Elggren: Shangri-La Sound

9.05pm: Gwilly Edmondez: Hocket

9.57pm: Doug Horne: Slowradio 1