Chris Watson

Radio Boredcast is archived at WFMU where you can listen to all 744-hours of this online radio project that ran continuously for the Festival month. WFMU is the longest-running freeform radio station in the US. Information about the programme schedule for this day is listed below. The Radio Boredcast archive can be listened to here.


THU 1 MARCH: 12PM

CARL STONE – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
As a musical instruction, "as slow as possible" has appeared in composers' scores for the past several centuries. In the past such a term had meaning because of the constraints of human abilities and the limits of instrumental mechanics. But in the digital world these constraints no longer exist. Instead the real problem to realize music "as slow as possible" in the digital age is due to Xeno's Paradox - anything that is slowed down can be slowed down still more. In this program I talk about the implications of musical slowness in the analog and digital ages and I present some music from as far back as ten centuries ago to the present day. (Carl Stone)

Carl Stone is one of the pioneers of live computer music, and has been hailed by the Village Voice as "the king of sampling" and "one of the best composers living in (the USA) today." He studied composition at the California Institute of the Arts with Morton Subotnick and James Tenney and has composed electro-acoustic music almost exclusively since 1972. His works have been performed across the world. http://www.sukothai.com

PLAYLIST:
Carl Stone: Leif Stretch Stretch (unreleased)
Alvin Lucier: I am Sitting In A Room (Lovely Records)
Carl Stone: Shing Kee (EAM DIscs 1990, New Albion 1992)
Imperial Court Orchestra of Japan: Goshoraku No Kyu (Columbia Music Entertainment)
Carl Stone: Water & Body, Part 1 (unreleased)

THU 1 MARCH: 1.45PM

VICKI BENNETT: PROGRAMME ANNOUNCEMENT
Vicki Bennett, curator/programmer of Radio Boredcast introduces us to the station.


THU 1 MARCH: 1.55PM

CHARLIE: BUSY DOING NOTHING – SLOW REPETITION FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
Repetition
Experimental, pop, hip-hop, comedy, and spoken-word audio pieces which use repetition as a formal device. I love a joke that repeats itself. I love a joke that repeats itself. (Charlie Lewis)

Charlie Lewis has been compiling music since he got a tape recorder at age eight, but it was not until his involvement with WFMU that he was able to foist his musical conglomerations on the public at large. He has been doing just that, both at that beacon of freeform radio and at other stations, and also for fashion shows and such, since 1996. He has played in various combos (http://bit.ly/tiWSoW), and written lots of music (http://bit.ly/tZEy2g), but has yet to outdo this work (http://bit.ly/vqiV0f).  Charlie worked in broadcast audio and in the music business for many years, but now does the more honest work of selling patent medicine. http://wfmu.org/playlists/CL 
http://beingslowlynowhere.typepad.com/

PLAYLIST:
bed: Pierre Bastien - Eloj du Piqueupe - Musiques Paralloidres   
David Mahler: Cup of Coffee - The Voice of the Poet
Negativland: Piece a Pie - No Business
Armand van Helden's Sampleslaya: Hot Butter - Enter the Meatmarket
People Like Us: Sugar and Spice - Thermos Explorer
The Marx Brothers: I'm Daffy Over You - Animal Crackers
bed: Dan Moses Schreier: Exotic (short version) - Sonic Circuits IV (various artists)
Phillip Glass: Prematurely Air-Conditioned Supermarket - Einstein on the Beach
Joe McGinty & the Brooklyn Organ Synthesizer Orchestra: Tubular Bells, end section
R. Stevie Moore: Everyone, But Everyone - The Future Is Worse Than the Past
Bruce Nauman: Pete and Repeat; Dark and Stormy Night - Raw Materials
Space Ghost Coast to Coast: Brak and Zorak: The Song That Doesn't End - Musical Bar-B-Que
Peter & Lou Berryman: Sing It Again - No Relation
Tenniscoats: Telen Pa Wu - Songs for Nao (various artists)
bed: Pierre Bastien - Eloj du Piqueupe
Asa-Chang & Junray: untitled Japanese counting song - Tsu Gi Ne Pu


THU 1 MARCH: 3.27PM

CHRIS WATSON: LUSKENTYRE – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
Luskentyre is a 32-minute time compression of a cycle of the tide on a beach in the western isles of Scotland.

Chris Watson is one of the world's leading recorders of wildlife and natural phenomena. In 1971 he was a founding member of the influential Sheffield-based experimental music group Cabaret Voltaire. His sound recording career began in 1981 when he joined Tyne Tees Television. Since then he has developed a particular and passionate interest in recording the wildlife sounds of animals, habitats and atmospheres from around the world. His television work includes Bill Oddie Back in the USA, Springwatch, Autumnwatch and The One Show. http://www.chriswatson.net


THU 1 MARCH: 4.02PM

DANIELA CASCELLA: 31 DAYS, SLOW AND STILL

31 DAYS READING LE PONT MIRABEAU BY GUILLAUME APOLLINAIRE AT 8.30AM – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
Le pont Mirabeau is a poem by Guillaume Apollinaire, published in his 1913 collection Alcools. In response to the theme and the structure of As Slow As Possible/Radio Boredcast, I chose to record myself reading Le pont Mirabeau at 8.30 in the morning for 31 days, anticipating and mirroring the duration of the broadcast in a different place and at a different time.

I chose this poem because of its slow flowing against its slowing into stillness – the flow of water, time and words in the stanzas against the circularity of time in the refrain. The adjective ‘slow’ appears still in the third stanza, the same one that contains ‘love’, ‘hope’, ‘violent’. The adjective ‘still’ appears slow in the refrain, as an impossibility. In the original French poem, ‘slow’ rhymes with ‘violent’ and ‘still I stay’ with ‘hours’.

The lack of punctuation throughout the poem calls not only for a flow of words, but also for different rhythms and meanings arising out of each reading. The readings always took place in my office, sometimes as dedicated recordings, sometimes while I was preparing to go out, sometimes while I was reading the paper or checking the news online. I learned the poem by heart, so sometimes the recordings mirror my small hesitations and gaps in recalling the verses. An old phonograph recording of Apollinaire reading the poem (from the Archives de Parole, Collection Phonothèque Nationale - Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris) supported some of the readings.

Daniela Cascella is a writer and curator based in London since 2009. Her research is focused on sound and on the way it seeps into other formats, most of all text. Her most recent projects explore and employ fictional tropes in writing criticism and descriptions of sound in fiction. She has recently finished writing her third book, En abÎme: a narrative across listening, reading and writing-as-landscape, as part of her research in the MFA Art Writing at Goldsmiths College that she completed in 2011. http://www.danielacascella.com


THU 1 MARCH: 4.08PM

DAVE SOLDIER: TIMELESS RADIO PROJECT – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
Timeless Music, explains the two physical dimensions of music and approaches to manipulate them, with musical examples.

For recorded music, the dimensions are air pressure amplitude and time: and for composed music the dimensions are frequency and time. We explore some approaches for how one can play with these dimensions, for example using fractal patterns with partial dimensions, so that issues like tempo become undefined, and the length of music become ambiguous.

The show includes explanations / illustrations of how to make deliberate fractal patterns in music, Fourier transform music and even a straightfoward explanation of white noise. (These are really not hard, and I'd like to think I explain them with minimal jargon.) 

Exploring this direction, I have prepared some math music:

The variations on Chopin's Minute Waltz uses integrals, derivatives, averages, and more.

My third string quartet, "The Essential" consists of mathematical variations on the second movement of Arnold Schoenberg’s Second Quartet, and can be heard and the score downloaded from the Scores page. It includes a derivative movement, an integral (very short), a fractal movement, and a Fourier transform. 

Olivia Porphyria, a fractal on Haydn's name, from Organum can also be heard and the score downloaded from the Scores page at http://www.davesoldier.com 

Here are scores for two other fractal pieces for trombone and two guitars, Fractal on the Name of Haydn (http://davesoldier.com/scores/FractalHaydn4.30.Frets.pdf) and Fractal on the Name of Bach (http://davesoldier.com/scores/FractalBach4.30.pdf). For clarity, though, I advise starting with the Fractal Variation in "The Essential Quartet" (see score page) which is easier to follow and is essentially equivalent to a Koch snowflake pattern.

Why haven't integrals and derivatives been used to compose? It's not hard. Here's a mini-lesson on making a derivative or integral version of a musical theme:

Use a C major scale, CDEFGABC. 

Assigning a number to each note, here starting at 0=C, the scale is: 0,2,4,5,7,9,11,12 

For a first derivative, subtract each note from the preceding note, (0),2,2,1,2,2,2,1

Which using the original scale tones would be: C,D,D,Db,D,D,D,Db: voila'! the first derivative! 

To integrate the derivative add each number to the previous, (0),2,4,5,7,9,11,12: which returns the original scale 

Integrate the original scale, and you'll see why integrals of the music rapidly go beyond the range of hearing! Examples are in the Essential Quartet and the Chopin Variations below, both with very short integral movements. 

Dave Soldier leads a double life as a musician and a neuroscientist. As a composer, he developed a repertoire for groups including the Thai Elephant Orchestra, 14 elephants for whom he built giant instruments and who released 3 CDs, and projects with children, including rural Guatemala (Yol Ku: Mayan Mountain Music) and New York's East Harlem (Da HipHop Raskalz). His Soldier String Quartet helped usher the use of hiphop, R&B, and punk rock into classical music in the 1980s, and his long-running Memphis/New York Delta punk band, the Kropotkins, is a cult favorite. His composed The People's Choice Music: the most wanted and unwanted songs, following poll results of likes and dislikes of the American population, with artists Komar & Melamid; song cycle/oratorios in collaborations with Kurt Vonnegut, and many chamber and classical works. As a performer and arranger, he worked with John Cale, Bo Diddley, Van Dyke Parks, David Byrne, and many jazz and avant garde acts, appearing on over 100 albums and films on violin, guitar, or arranger. As David Sulzer, he is a neuroscientist and Professor at Columbia University in the Departments of Psychiatry and Neurology. http://davesoldier.com/experimental.html


THU 1 MARCH: 4.50PM

MATMOS: MUSIQUE CONCRETE HOUR 1 – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
In response to the invitation to contribute sound, which somehow speaks to the stated theme of slow audio, we have decided to focus upon musique concrete and its aftermath. The original practitioners of the musique concrete tradition - which was a global phenomenon, and not simply a continental one as it often supposed - had to work carefully, methodically, and above all, slowly. In order to capture, manipulate, process and assemble their work, decisions had to be made and enacted, plans drawn up, trials conducted and errors removed. Lots of painstaking, hands on work stands behind each edit, each cut, each splice, each pass through a filter or into a process. The music soaks up and stores time, and it plays with time as a basic material. This music is both intensive and extensive in its demands upon its creators and its listeners. That said, we have not narrowly emphasized only the pioneers, but have sought to draw some connections between the first generation and subsequent audio, which seems to us to draw inspiration from this methodology. Slow down and enjoy.

Matmos is M.C. Schmidt and Drew Daniel, aided and abetted by many others. In their recordings and live performances over the last nine years, Matmos have used the sounds of: amplified crayfish nerve tissue, the pages of bibles turning, a bowed five string banjo, slowed down whistles and kisses, water hitting copper plates, the runout groove of a vinyl record, a $5.00 electric guitar, liposuction surgery, cameras and VCRs, chin implant surgery, contact microphones on human hair, violins, rat cages, tanks of helium, violas, human skulls, cellos, peck horns, tubas, cards shuffling, field recordings of conversations in hot tubs, frequency response tests for defective hearing aids, a steel guitar recorded in a sewer, electrical interference generated by laser eye surgery, whoopee cushions and balloons, latex fetish clothing, rhinestones on a dinner plate, Polish trains, insects, ukelele, aspirin tablets hitting a drum kit from across the room, dogs barking, people reading aloud, life support systems and inflatable blankets, records chosen by the roll of dice, an acupuncture point detector conducting electrical current through human skin, rock salt crunching underfoot, solid gold coins spinning on bars of solid silver, the sound of a frozen stream thawing in the sun, a five gallon bucket of oatmeal. http://brainwashed.com/matmos/bio/


THU 1 MARCH: 5.57PM

TOUCHAVRADIO: MIKE HARDING PRESENTS… TIME – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
TouchAVRadio (2011). Compiled by Mike Harding

Time:
Walo Shatan Gwari: "FARMING IS THE MOST IMPORTANT OCCUPATION TODAY"
Ken Shabby: "Live in Kyoto" (2000)
The London Snorkelling Team: "The Creep"
Jana Winderen: "North Atlantic Drift", JunKroom at Urban Guild, Kyoto 2009
Joachim Nordwall: “Ignition” (extract, fading...)

TouchRadio: Jon Wozencroft and Mike Harding made various collections on cassette over the first ten years of Touch (1982-1992), some actually called "TouchRadio", and some not. TouchRadio is now a formally presented collection of episodes (70 at time of writing) on its own website. It also was acquisitioned as a "Named Collection" by The British Library in 2010. http://www.touchradio.org.uk


THU 1 MARCH: 7.00PM

RADIO WEB MACBA PRESENTS: COMPOSING WITH PROCESS – PERSPECTIVES ON GENERATIVE AND SYSTEMS MUSIC #4.1. TIME.

BY MARK FELL AND JOE GILMORE   
Ràdio Web MACBA is the Museu d'art contemporani de Barcelona (MACBA) online radio project. http://rwm.macba.cat

Curated by Mark Fell and Joe Gilmore. Narrated by Connie Treanor.

The fourth episode in this series introduces the idea of time and its relationship to musical practices. The show opens with thoughts about time drawn from philosophy, science and musicology and shows how these are expressed in musical form, and looks at the origins of sonic action, musical behaviors and notational systems as a way of engaging with the temporal realm. With a specific reference to the emergence of sound recording technologies – both vinyl and tape – the show examines how new technologies have impacted musical vocabularies and changed the relationship between sound, time and music. It closes with a brief look at how computer based editing has extended this paradigm and opened the way for stochastic methods of sound generation.
http://rwm.macba.cat/en/research/composingwithprocess_4_mark_fell_joe_gilmore/capsula


THU 1 MARCH: 8.02PM

ERGO PHIZMIZ SINGS GILBERT AND SULLIVAN: THE PIRATES OF PENZANCE – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
Around the age of 11 or 12 I became obsessed with the comic operettas of Gilbert & Sullivan. This fascination lasted around 3 years. There were posters of W.S. Gilbert (the "S" stands for Schwenck, rather spectacularly) and Arthur Sullivan on my bedroom wall.

For years the thought of returning to their works "from memory" has been at the back of my mind. My very boring contribution to Radio Boredcast is "acappella" versions of the G & S operettas "HMS Pinafore", "Iolanthe", "The Pirates of Penzance" and "The Mikado".

Some of them I know better than others. In the cases where I didn't know the melodies, I made them up or roughly talked through them. I also decided to not use different voices for characters (these recordings are my second takes - the first takes sounded like The Goon Show and to be honest I had far too much fun doing them for it be genuinely boring), and to omit stage directions, so we are left with a very boring barrage of Victorian words, tuned and untuned, from my tired, monotone voice.

Ergo Phizmiz is a composer, writer, and multimedia artist. He makes pop, theatre, installations, opera, radio-art, radioplays, sound-collages and performances. He lives in Bridport, UK, and has a headache. He never wants to perform Gilbert & Sullivan again. http://ergophizmiz.net


THU 1 MARCH: 8.57PM

IRENE MOON – LETS TALK SCIENCE: THE ICE SHOW IN CONVERSATION WITH CHRIS WATSON – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
Irene uses her entomological and scientific background to connect with individuals from the scientific community; discussing their perception of time on topics they are most intimate and familiar. http://www.begoniasociety.org

Chris Watson is one of the world's leading recorders of wildlife and natural phenomena for television documentary and musical collaborations. Our topic is ice at the end of the world and his impression of recording in Antarctica. http://www.chriswatson.net


THU 1 MARCH: 9.59PM

LANGUAGE REMOVAL SERVICES: THE MIDDLE EAST PEACE PROCESS – FOR RADIO BOREDCAST
Chris Kubick is an artist, composer and sound designer who works under a variety of pseudonyms, including Language Removal Services, an institute and laboratory founded by one Dr. Raymond Chronic that may or may not exist solely as the web site http://www.languageremoval.com.

Kubick frequently collaborates with Anne Walsh, and together they have created ARCHIVE, whose best-known project, entitled Art After Death consists of interviews with artists who have died conducted through spirit mediums. Together their work has appeared in the 2002 Whitney Biennial and at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco; the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; and the Royal College of Art, London. Kubick has been heard on public radio in the U.S., Canada and Great Britain.


THU 1 MARCH: 11.02PM

THE LONG NOW FOUNDATION: WILL WRIGHT AND BRIAN ENO – PLAYING WITH TIME
In a dazzling duet Will Wright and Brian Eno gave an intense clinic on the joys and techniques of “generative” creation. Back in the 1970s they both got hooked by cellular automata such as Conway’s “Game of Life,” where just a few simple rules could unleash profoundly unpredictable and infinitely varied dynamic patterns. Cellular automata were the secret ingredient of Wright’s genre-busting computer game “SimCity” in 1989. Eno was additionally inspired by Steve Reich’s “It’s Gonna Rain,” in which two identical 1.8 second tape loops beat against each other out of phase for a riveting 20 minutes. That idea led to Eno’s “Music for Airports” (1978), and the genre he named “ambient music” was born.

Wright observed that science is all about compressing reality to minimal rule sets, but generative creation goes the opposite direction. You look for a combination of the fewest rules that can generate a whole complex world that will always surprise you, yet within a framework that stays recognizable. “It’s not engineering and design,” he said, “so much as it is gardening. You plant seeds. Richard Dawkins says that a willow seed has only about 800K of data in it.”

Eno noted that ambient music, unlike “narrative” music with a beginning, middle, and end, presents a steady state. “It’s more like watching a river.” Wright said he often uses Eno’s music to work to because it gets him in a productive trancelike state. Eno remarked that it’s important to keep reducing what the music attempts, and one way he does that is compose everything at double the speed it will be released. Slowing it down reduces its busyness. Wright: “How about an album of the fast versions?” Eno: “‘Amphetamine Ambient.’” http://longnow.org/seminars/02006/jun/26/playing-with-time/

Courtesy of the Long Now Foundation. http://longnow.org/

TOP

Radio Boredcast:
Day 1

Thu 1 March 2012, 12pm–12am
To listen click here

Read blog here

DAY 1 SCHEDULE:

12.00pm: Carl Stone: for Radio Boredcast

1.45pm: Vicki Bennett: Programme announcement

1.55pm: Charlie: Busy Doing Nothing - Slow Repetition

3.27pm: Chris Watson: Luskentyre

4.02pm: Daniela Cascella: 31 Days, Slow and Still

4.08pm: Dave Soldier: Timeless Radio Project

4.50pm: Matmos: Musique Concrete Hour 1

5.57pm: TouchAVRadio: Mike Harding Presents... Time

7.00pm: Radio Web MACBA Presents: Composing With Process 

8.02pm: Ergo Phizmiz Sings Gilbert and Sullivan: The Pirates of Penzance

8.57pm: Irene Moon: Let's Talk Science - The Ice Show - in conversation with Chris Watson

9.59pm: Language Removal Services: The Middle East Peace Process 

11.02pm: The Long Now Foundation: Will Wright and Brian Eno - Playing With Time