Jem Finer, Slowplayer, 2005/12. Photo: Colin Davison. Courtesy of AV Festival 12

Jem Finer, Slowplayer, 2005/12. Photo: Colin Davison. Courtesy of AV Festival 12

Jem Finer, Slowplayer, 2005/12. Photo: Colin Davison. Courtesy of AV Festival 12

Jem Finer, Slowplayer, 2005/12. Photo: Colin Davison. Courtesy of AV Festival 12

Jem Finer, Slowplayer, 2005/12. Photo: Colin Davison. Courtesy of AV Festival 12

Jem Finer, Slowplayer, 2005/12. Photo: Colin Davison. Courtesy of AV Festival 12

Jem Finer, Slowplayer, 2005/12. Photo: Colin Davison. Courtesy of AV Festival 12

Jem Finer, Slowplayer, 2005/12. Photo: Colin Davison. Courtesy of AV Festival 12

Jem Finer, Slowplayer, 2005/12. Photo: Colin Davison. Courtesy of AV Festival 12

Jem Finer, Slowplayer, 2005/12. Photo: Colin Davison. Courtesy of AV Festival 12

Jem Finer, Slowplayer, 2005/12. Photo: Colin Davison. Courtesy of AV Festival 12

Jem Finer, Slowplayer, 2005/12. Photo: Colin Davison. Courtesy of AV Festival 12

Jem Finer, Slowplayer, 2005/12. Photo: Colin Davison. Courtesy of AV Festival 12

Jem Finer with Slowplayer, 2005/12. Photo: Colin Davison. Courtesy of AV Festival 12

At extreme slow speeds, the spin of a record player is reduced to a glacial crawl, the music to seismic rumbling. A beat may last a minute, and the tiny slices of silence between them become ambient voids. On each day of the Festival a different record was played, from Ravel to The Sex Pistols to Ornette Coleman, slowed down to the length of the gallery opening hours. With this work Jem Finer continues his interest in long-durational processes and extremes of scale.

Biography
Jem Finer is a UK-based artist, musician and composer. Since studying computer science in the 1970s, he has worked in a variety of fields, including photography, film, music and installation. His 1000-year long musical composition, Longplayer, represents a convergence of many of his concerns, particularly those relating to systems, long-durational processes and extremes of scale in both time and space. 

Among his other works is Score For a Hole In the Ground, a permanent, self-sustaining musical installation in a forest in Kent which relies only on gravity and the elements to be audible. Between 2003 and 2005 he was artist in residence in the Astrophysics Department of Oxford University, making a number of works including two sculptural observatories, Landscope and The Centre of the Universe. Recent work, focusing on his interest in long-term sustainability and the reconfiguring of older technologies, includes Spiegelei, a 360-degree spherical camera obscura. 

Credit
Curated and produced by AV Festival 12.

Jem Finer: Slowplayer

FREE

Preview: Fri 2 March 2012, 9am-3pm

Thu 1 March – Sat 31 March 2012

The NewBridge Project

18 New Bridge Street West
Newcastle NE1 8AW
thenewbridgeproject.com

Opening Times
Mon – Sun 12–6pm