As Slow As Possible Symposium, 2012. Photo: Colin Davison. Courtesy of AV Festival 12

As Slow As Possible Symposium, 2012. Photo: Colin Davison. Courtesy of AV Festival 12

As Slow As Possible Symposium, 2012. Photo: Colin Davison. Courtesy of AV Festival 12

As Slow As Possible Symposium, 2012. Photo: Colin Davison. Courtesy of AV Festival 12

As Slow As Possible Symposium, 2012. Photo: Colin Davison. Courtesy of AV Festival 12

As Slow As Possible Symposium, 2012. Photo: Colin Davison. Courtesy of AV Festival 12

As Slow As Possible Symposium, 2012. Photo: Colin Davison. Courtesy of AV Festival 12

As Slow As Possible Symposium, 2012. Photo: Colin Davison. Courtesy of AV Festival 12

As Slow As Possible Symposium, 2012. Photo: Colin Davison. Courtesy of AV Festival 12

Taking its point of departure from the AV Festival 12 theme of slowness, the symposium investigated how we might activate temporal concepts which are resistant to those normalised in mainstream commercially driven cultural forms.

How are artists, composers or musicians exploring time in ways that often utilise the latest digital technologies but also challenge their conventional deployment? The subject of 'Slowness', albeit in its most varied manifestations embracing multiple non-linear 'speeds' and rhythms (and thus refusing any simplistic polarisation with 'speed' as such), provided a central theme for the panel discussion. Ideas relating to how time can be multiplied, diversified, folded and suspended in contemporary art and culture were also examined.

Eminent French philosopher Eric Alliez, cultural and music critic Paul Morley, performance art specialist and writer Laura Cull,  and film theorist and philosopher John Mullarkey will draw on their unique intellectual and personal engagements with time in the history of ideas, popular culture and contemporary art in this afternoon symposium, an 'overture' of sorts to the 24 hour opening of the AV Festival 12. The symposium began with presentations from AV Festival 12 artists including John Gerrard, Jem Finer and Vicki Bennett. Moderated by Katherine Waugh.

Biographies
Eric Alliez is a French philosopher and Professor of Philosophy at the Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy at Kingston University, UK. His research areas include philosophy and contemporary art, history of time and studies on Deleuze and Guattari. Publications include Capital Times: Tales from the Conquest of Time (1996), La Pensee-Matisse: portrait de l'artiste en hyperfauve (2005), L'Oeil-Cerveau: Nouvelles histories de la peinture moderne (with Jean-Clet Martin 2007)

Laura Cull is a lecturer in Performing Arts at Northumbria University in Newcastle. She is editor of Deleuze & Performance (Edinburgh University Press) and chair of the Performance & Philosophy Working Group within Performance Studies International. Her PhD develops the concept of ‘differential presence’ in performance through the philosophy of Gilles Deleuze.

Paul Morley is a cultural critic and author, he wrote for the New Musical Express from 1977 to 1983 and was the first presenter of BBC2's The Late Show. He still regularly appears on BBC2’s Newsnight Review programme. For the short-lived Channel 4 arts strand Without Walls he wrote and presented a documentary on boredom. Morley is the author of Words and Music: the history of pop in the shape of a city, Ask: The Chatter of Pop and the biographical book Nothing.

Katherine Waugh is a writer and filmmaker based in Galway. She is co-director, with Fergus Daly, of The Art of Time (2010), a film that explores philosophies of temporality in contemporary art, film and architecture. The Art of Time was screened as part of the Festival at Tyneside Cinema in Newcastle on Sat 3 March.

John Mullarkey is Professor of Film and Television Studies at Kingston University, London. He has also taught philosophy and film theory at the University of Sunderland, England (1994-2004) and the University of Dundee, Scotland (2004 to 2010). He has published Bergson and Philosophy (1999), Post-Continental Philosophy: An Outline (2006), Philosophy and the Moving Image: Refractions of Reality (2010), and edited, with Beth Lord, The Continuum Companion to Continental Philosophy (2009). He is an editor of the journal Film-Philosophy, and chair of the Society for European Philosophy.

Credit
Co-curated by Katherine Waugh and AV Festival 12. 

As Slow As Possible Symposium

FREE

Thu 1 March 2012, 2–5pm

mima, Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art

Centre Square
Middlesbrough TS1 2AZ
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