Various Speakers, The Television will not be Revolutionised?, 2008. Photo: Louise Hepworth. Courtesy of AV Festival

Various Speakers, The Television will not be Revolutionised?, 2008. Photo: Louise Hepworth. Courtesy of AV Festival

Various Speakers, The Television will not be Revolutionised?, 2008. Photo: Louise Hepworth. Courtesy of AV Festival

Various Speakers, The Television will not be Revolutionised?, 2008. Photo: Louise Hepworth. Courtesy of AV Festival

Various Speakers, The Television will not be Revolutionised?, 2008. Photo: Louise Hepworth. Courtesy of AV Festival

Various Speakers, The Television will not be Revolutionised?, 2008. Photo: Louise Hepworth. Courtesy of AV Festival

Various Speakers, The Television will not be Revolutionised?, 2008. Photo: Louise Hepworth. Courtesy of AV Festival

The switchover from analogue to digital broadcasting has begun, the proliferation of viewing choices continues apace and the old viewing parlour ‘community’ of the 1950s - 1970s has fragmented, probably beyond recall. But is the much vaunted digital switchover really going to revolutionise television? Or is the switch to digital simply going to create a surfeit of programming which we cannot possibly keep up with? How can broadcasting meet the needs of the people after switch-off? 

You could join the broadcasting sector’s luminaries and visionaries for a lively two-day debate about the future of broadcasting in the UK and your place it in. It was most apt that the debate happened on the day that the Secretary of State for Culture and Broadcasting, James Purnell, made his first visit to the North East of England, broadcast nationally from the North East on BBC’s Question Time.

Speakers included one of the UK’s top commentators on new technology Bill Thompson. He will be familiar to BBC radio listeners, for his reports on Go Digital (now Digital Planet), and to readers of the Guardian, BBC News and the New Statesman.

Credit
Curated and produced by AV Festival 08.

Symposium: The Television Will Not Be Revolutionised?

FREE

Thu 6 March – Fri 7 March 2008, 12-5pm

Digital Media Centre

St Peter's Campus
University of Sunderland
Sunderland SR6 0DD